Kids Corner Quiz

Just for Fun! 

See how many of the following questions you can answer correctly. Read the question and click on the answer you think is correct. Good luck!

 

  • 1. What is the name of the buffalo on the reverse of the Buffalo Nickel?
    • 1. What is the name of the buffalo on the reverse of the Buffalo Nickel?

       

       

       

      Rintintin _iv _rip _mastersA. Rin Tin Tin is NOT a correct answer.

      Rin Tin Tin was the name of a German Shepherd who starred in 26 films and his own TV show. 

      Know More!

       

    • 1. What is the name of the buffalo on the reverse of the Buffalo Nickel?

      B. Peter is NOT a correct answer.


      EaglePeter was the name of the eagle that lived at the Philadelphia Mint in the early 19th century.   As the story is told by Philadelphia historian John Francis Marion, early in the 19th century       Peter adopted the Mint as his home and became a mascot. One day he was perched on a f     flywheel when it suddenly started. His wing was caught and broken and though tenderly cared for by his Mint mates, he died. Peter was mounted and is on display at the Philadelphia Mint - the spirit of the past in the modern Mint.

      Some believe that Peter was the model for the eagle on the United States silver dollars (1836-39) and for the Flying Eagle cents (1856-58).

    • 1. What is the name of the buffalo on the reverse of the Buffalo Nickel?

       

      C. Black Diamond is the correct answer!


      1913buff 5c _revBlack Diamond was James Fraser's model for the reverse (or back) of the Buffalo Nickel. Black Diamond lived in New York's Central Park Zoo.

       

    • 1. What is the name of the buffalo on the reverse of the Buffalo Nickel?

       

      D. Bison Bill is NOT a correct answer.

      What is the difference between bison and buffalo? Scientifically, the term "buffalo" is incorrect for the North American species; its proper Latin name is Bison bison. However, common usage has made the term "buffalo" an acceptable synonym for the American bison. (from The American Buffalo in Transition, by J. Albert Rorabacher.)

      The great American bison is a truly magnificent animal. It is the largest land mammal in North America since the end of the Ice Age. Estimates of the pre-European herd size vary from 30,000,000 to 70,000,000 animals and they ranged over most of North America.

      There are three subspecies of bison: the Plains bison, Wood bison, and the European Wisent.

      Where bison and Native Americans lived together, the bison provided much more than food.

      Unregulated killing of bison led to the many millions of animals being reduced to no more than 1,500 individuals in the mid to late 1800s.

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  • 2. The "obverse" is which side of a coin?
    • 2. The "obverse" is which side of a coin?

      A. The Heads Side is ONE correct answer.


      CENT_OBV

       

       

       

       

      The term "obverse" applies almost exclusively to coins; usually describing the front or "heads" side of a coin. Oddly enough, the term "obverse" also applies to flags. The front of a flag is the obverse.

      By law, the obverse of a United States coin must have an image representing "Liberty." The portrait of Abraham Lincoln, past president of the U.S. represents "Liberty." The obverse must also have the motto of the United States "In God We Trust," and the year the coin was made (except the 50-state quarters where the year was moved to the reverse, or back, of the coin).

    • 2. The "obverse" is which side of a coin?

       

      B. The Front of the Coin is ONE correct answer.

      CENT_OBV

       

       

       

       

      The term "obverse" applies almost exclusively to coins; usually describing the front or "heads" side of a coin. Oddly enough, the term "obverse" also applies to flags. The front of a flag is the obverse.

      By law, the obverse of a United States coin must have an image representing "Liberty." The portrait of Abraham Lincoln, past president of the U.S. represents "Liberty." The obverse must also have the motto of the United States "In God We Trust," and the year the coin was made (except the 50-state quarters where the year was moved to the reverse, or back, of the coin).

    • 2. The "obverse" is which side of a coin?

       

      C. The Back of the Coin is NOT a correct answer.


      CENT_REV

       

       

       

      The back of a coin is referred to as the "reverse" or "tails" side of the coin. There are no "tails" on the back, of the Lincoln Cent but there are "tales" about the cent. The Lincoln Monument was placed on the back of the cent in 1959, replacing the earlier "Wheat Ears Reverse" (1909-1958) to commemorate Lincoln's 150th birthday.

      Did you know that the Lincoln Cent is one of two coins with the same president on both the front and back side? Lincoln's portrait is on the front and if you peek into the Lincoln Monument on the back you will see the statue of Abraham Lincoln.

      Another coin with the same president on both sides is the New Jersey quarter. Why?

    • 2. The "obverse" is which side of a coin?

      D. Both A & B is the correct answer!


      The term "obverse" applies almost exclusively to coins; usually describing the front or "heads" side of a coin. Oddly enough, the term "obverse" also applies to flags. The front of a flag is the obverse.

      By law, the obverse of a United States coin must have an image representing "Liberty." The portrait of Abraham Lincoln, past president of the U.S. represents "Liberty." The obverse must also have the motto of the United States "In God We Trust," and the year the coin was made (except the 50-state quarters where the year was moved to the reverse, or back, of the coin).

      CENT_OBV

  • 3. Who is pictured on the obverse of the modern U.S. quarter?
    • 3. Who is pictured on the obverse of the modern U.S. quarter?

       

      A. Abraham Lincoln is NOT the correct answer.


      Illinois _Quarter

       

      Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States (1861-1865) is not pictured on the obverse (front) of the modern U.S. quarter BUT he is pictured on the reverse (back) of the Illinois State Quarter. What other coins picture "Honest Abe"?

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    • 3. Who is pictured on the obverse of the modern U.S. quarter?

       

      B. Thomas Jefferson is NOT a correct answer.


      150px -2006_Nickel _LINE_ART_Obv

      Thomas Jefferson is not pictured on the obverse of the modern U.S. quarter but he is pictured on the U.S. nickel or five-cent coin.

      The nickel's design since 1938 has featured a profile of President Thomas Jefferson on the obverse. From 1938 to 2003, Monticello was featured on the reverse.

      For 2004 and 2005, nickels featured new designs to commemorate the bicentennials of the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark expedition; these new designs were called the Westward Journey nickel series.

      In 2006, Monticello returned to the reverse, while a new image of Jefferson facing forward was featured on the obverse.

    • 3. Who is pictured on the obverse of the modern U.S. quarter?

       

      C. Miss Liberty is NOT a correct answer.


      Ana _consumer _protect

      By law, an image representing "Liberty" must be on the obverse or front of a U.S. coin. Many coins from the 18th and 19th and early 20th centuries have images of "Miss Liberty." One representation is pictured here of "Walking Liberty" on a half dollar (1916-1947).

      Most modern United States coins have "Liberty" represented by a past president. Abraham Lincoln is on the cent, Thomas Jefferson is on the nickel and Franklin Roosevelt is on the dime. But who is on the quarter? Hint: He was the FIRST president of the United States.

    • 3. Who is pictured on the obverse of the modern U.S. quarter?

       

      D. George Washington is the correct answer!


      150px -State -Quarters -Obv -Unc

      George Washington, the first president of the United States has appeared on the U.S. quarter since 1932, the 200th anniversary of his birth. The image shown is of the updated obverse on the statehood quarters.  

      One story about Washington has him throwing a silver dollar across the Potomac River. He may have thrown an object across the Rappahannock River, the river on which his childhood home, Ferry Farm, stood. However, the Potomac is over a mile wide at Mount Vernon. Also silver dollars did not exist then.

      While Washington did not accept pay while the Commander of the Continential Army, he did claim expenses. He is said to have had quite an interesting expense account.

  • 4. Who is pictured on the front of a modern U.S. $5 note?
    • 4. Who is pictured on the front of a modern U.S. $5 note?

       

      A. Abraham Lincoln is the correct answer!

      $5_note

      Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) was the 16th President of the United States (1861-1865) and the first republican president.

      According to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (where U.S. paper money is printed), the average life of a $5 bill in circulation is 24 months before it is replaced due to wear. Approximately 9 percent of all notes produced today are $5.

      The back of the modern $5 note pictures the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC.

    • 4. Who is pictured on the front of a modern U.S. $5 note?

       

      B. Martin Luther King Jr. is NOT the correct answer.

       

       

      Martin -Luther -King

       

       

       

      "I have a dream, that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character."

      Martin Luther King Jr. (1929 - 1968).

      A group of civil rights activists attempted unsuccessfully in 2000 to place his image on the half dollar. Beforehand, these same people also attempted several times to place King's image on the twenty dollar bill.

      Perhaps one day Martin Luther King Jr. will be honored on U.S. currency.

       

       


       

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 5. Who is pictured on a modern U.S. $1 note?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • D. George Washington is the correct answer!


      150px -State -Quarters -Obv -UncGeorge Washington, the first president of the United States has appeared on the U.S. quarter since 1932, the 200th anniversary of his birth. The image shown is of the updated obverse on the statehood quarters.  

      One story about Washington has him throwing a silver dollar across the Potomac River. He may have thrown an object across the Rappahannock River, the river on which his childhood home, Ferry Farm, stood. However, the Potomac is over a mile wide at Mount Vernon. Also silver dollars did not exist then.

      While Washington did not accept pay while the Commander of the Continential Army, he did claim expenses. He is said to have had quite an interesting expense account.

  • 6. Who is portrayed on the modern U.S. nickel?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer. 

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer. 

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer. 

    • D. Thomas Jefferson is the correct answer!


      150px -2006_Nickel _LINE_ART_ObvThomas Jefferson is pictured on the U.S. nickel or five-cent coin.

      The nickel's design since 1938 has featured a profile of President Thomas Jefferson on the obverse. From 1938 to 2003, Monticello was featured on the reverse.

      For 2004 and 2005, nickels featured new designs to commemorate the bicentennials of the Louisiana Purchase and the Lewis and Clark expedition; these new designs were called the Westward Journey nickel series.

      In 2006, Monticello returned to the reverse, while a new image of Jefferson facing forward was featured on the obverse.

      As collectibles, Jefferson nickels are one of the easiest sets of any denomination to collect from circulation. One can still find coins from the 1940s in circulation on occasion. Many Jefferson nickel collectors look for fully struck steps on the image of Monticello. Premiums are paid for coins with five or six full steps.

  • 7. What motto appears on both U.S. Coins and Currency?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer. 

    • B. In God We Trust is the correct answer!

      2-cent _piece

      Since 1956 "In God We Trust" has been the official national motto of the United States.

      The motto was first placed on United States coins largely because of the increased religious sentiment existing during the American Civil War (1861-1865). The first United States coin to bear this motto was the 1864 two-cent piece (pictured). The motto did not appear on paper money until the 1950s.

      Before 1956, the national motto was "E Pluribus Unum" (From many, one) which refers to the 13 original colonies coming together to form one united country.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer. 

       

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 8. Where was a nickel made that has a "D" Mintmark?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • C. Denver is the correct answer!

      Denver _mint

      The mint in Denver, Colorado is a branch of the United States Mint. It was established in 1906 and today produces coins for circulation.

      United States gold coins made from 1838 to 1861 may also have a "D" mintmark - but they were not made in Denver, they were made at the Dahlonega Mint in Georgia. Dahlonega operated as a branch mint until the start of the American Civil War.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 9. Where was a dime struck that has an "S" Mintmark?
    • A. San Francisco is the correct answer!

      Sfmint 1_lg

      The mint in San Francisco, California is a branch of the United States Mint. It opened in 1854 to serve the gold mines of the California Gold Rush. The building that is pictured opened in 1847 and served until 1937 when the current facility opened. This building was one of the few structures that survived the great 1906 earthquake.

      Know More!

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 10. Where was a quarter struck that has a "P" Mintmark?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • C. Philadelphia is the correct answer!

      Mintmarks were first developed to locate a problem. If a coin was underweight, or overweight, the mintmark would immediately tell where the coin was minted, and the problem could be located and fixed. The first mintmarks, called "Magistrate Marks" were developed by the Greek.

      In 1649, the directors of the Spanish colonial American Mint at Potosi, in what is today Bolivia, were condemned to death for putting less precious metal in the coins than was specified by law. The initials of the assayer as well as the mintmark were immediate identifiers of when and where the coins were inspected.

      Other mintmarks on United States coins include "D" for Denver (1906 to present), "S" for San Francisco (1854-present), "W" for West Point (1937-present), "CC" for Carson City (1870-1893), "C" for Charlotte (1838-1861), "D" for Dahlonega (1838-1861) and "O" for New Orleans (1838-1909).

      In 1920 a branch of the United States Mint was established in Manila in the Philippines, then a colony of the U.S. It produced coins from 1920-1941 with an "M" mintmark.

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    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 11. Where was a penny struck that has no mintmark?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • D. Philadelphia or West Point is a correct answer!

      At one time, only the branch mints (Denver, San Francisco, Carson City, Charlotte) placed mintmarks on the coins struck at their facilities. The Philadelphia Mint was the main mint and coins struck there received no identifying mark - it was understood that coins with no mark were struck in Philadelphia. The West Point Mint Facility opened in 1937 and helped the Philadelphia Mint with production of Lincoln cents and Bicentennial quarters.

      The first coins struck with a "W" mintmark for West Point were $10 American Gold Eagles commemorating the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games.

  • 12. When were the first large cents struck at the US. Mint in Philadelphia?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • D. 1793 is the correct answer!

      Chain _cent

       

      In 1792 it was decided to build a mint in Philadelphia, which was, at the time, the nation's capitol. David Rittenhouse, a leading American scientist, was appointed the first Director of the Mint by President George Washington.

      The Philadelphia Mint produced the first coins, copper large cents and half cents, in 1793. By law, all U.S. coins were required to have an image of "Liberty" on the front.

      The portrait shown here of "liberty" received a lot of critism at the time. Respectable women in the late 18th century had neatly coiffed hair, quite unlike the disheveled look seen on the figure of Liberty here.

  • 13. What famous black American is portrayed on two Commemorative Coins?
    • A. Booker T. Washington is the correct answer!

      Booker TWashington1

      "I will let no man drag me down so low as to make me hate him."
      Booker T. Washington (1856-1915)

      The Booker T. Washington Memorial silver commemorative was issued in 1946; both Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver were pictured on a silver commemorative in 1951.

      Born into slavery, Booker T. Washington became an influential political leader, educator and author.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 14. What is the name for the metal disc before it is struck into a coin?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • B. Planchet is the correct answer!

      How Coins Are Made

      Step 1. Metals are purified and then mixed.
      The first step is very important because when the metals come from the mines they are not pure. The metals are purified by a process called refining.The purified metals are then mixed together in the
      correct combination needed to make coins.This mixture is called an alloy.

      Step 2. Metal alloys are cast.
      After the metal is mixed into the correct alloy, the metal is cast into bars known as ingots. The ingots are thick, very heavy blocks of metal.

      Step 3. Ingots are rolled.
      The metal ingots are squeezed between two powerful rollers that compress the ingots into long strips. Since the strips are the thickness of coins, the ingots have to be rolled many times.

      Step 4. Blanks are punched.
      Once the strips are the right thickness, they are fed into the blanking press. In the blanking press circular pieces of metal are punched out of the metal strips. These pieces of metal are known as blanks.

      Step 5. Blanks are sorted.
      Sometimes when the blanks are made, mistakes occur and not all of the blanks are the correct size or shape. So the blanks are sent through a sorter known as a riddler. This machine shakes the blanks and
      sorts them through different size holes. Only the correct size and shape blanks get past the riddler and are struck into coins.

      Step 6. Blanks are annealed and cleaned.
      In making blanks, a lot of work has been done to the metal. All this work makes the blanks very brittle and they would break if struck into coins.To harden the blanks and make them not brittle, the blanks undergo a process called annealing. The blanks are then cleaned and brightened and almost reading for striking.

      Step 7. Blanks are given a rim.
      Just before the blanks are sent to be struck into coins, they pass through the upsetting mill where their edges are slightly squeezed. This process gives the blanks a raised rim. Now the blanks are called planchets.

      Step 8. Coins are struck.
      The planchets are fed into the coining chamber and placed on the lower die. A collar die rises up to hold the planchet in place, and under tons of pressure the upper die is sent crashing down onto the planchet. The planchet is now a coin.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 15. What is the tooth-like design around the circumference of some older coins called?
    • A. Denticles is the correct answer!

      2-cent _piece

      Denticles are used to produce a border on a coin. The border is usually thicker than the rest of the coin to protect the surface from excessive damage - and to help them stack better

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 16. A collectible coin should be held...
    • Very good. That is one correct answer - but check to see if there are more correct answers.

    • Very good. That is one correct answer - but check to see if there are more correct answers.

    • Very good. That is one correct answer - but check to see if there are more correct answers.

    • Excellent! That is the correct answer. Now go back and try another!

  • 17. What is a "Loon Dollar"?
  • 18. What is a Spanish 8 reales coin called?
    • Very good. That is one correct answer - but check to see if there are more correct answers.

    • Very good. That is one correct answer - but check to see if there are more correct answers.

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    • Excellent! That is the correct answer. 

  • 19. The United States once made...
    • Very good. That is one correct answer - but check to see if there are more correct answers.

    • Very good. That is one correct answer - but check to see if there are more correct answers.

    • Very good. That is one correct answer - but check to see if there are more correct answers.

    • Excellent! That is the correct answer. 

  • 20. What country pictured an automobile on a coin in 1928?
    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • Excellent! That is the correct answer. 

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

    • I'm sorry, that is an incorrect answer.

  • 20. What is the lowest denomination of U.S. paper money ever printed?