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27 Feb 2015

Short Snorter notes dropping prior to Portland National Money Show

National Money Show | ANA Official Post | ANAStaff

Short Snorter notes dropping prior to Portland National Money Show

Thomas Sparks to place eight notes into circulation during ANA event


Thomas Sparks, the founder of the Short Snorter Project and a member of the American Numismatic Association, will drop eight vintage blue seal U.S. $1 silver certificate Short Snorters into circulation in Portland, Oregon, during the 2015 National Money Show, to be held March 5-7 at the Oregon Convention Center.


Sparks will drop four Short Snorter notes into circulation on Wednesday, March 4, the day before the show opens. He plans to drop another four into circulation on Friday, March 6.  


A Short Snorter is a banknote that has been signed by people traveling together by aircraft. The tradition began in the 1920s with Alaskan bush pilots and spread through military and commercial aviation, especially during World War II. The term “short snort” means less than a full shot of liquor, a joke among pilots who knew the dangers of mixing aviation and alcohol.


Of the five Short Snorters that will be dropped into circulation, one of them is signed by Red Skelton, a comedian and clown who was part of several United Service Organization (USO) tours during World War II.


“I wish to bring attention to the Short Snorter tradition and provide a means to educate the public about these artifacts brought home by brave men and women who served our country,” Sparks said. “The Short Snorter Project is dedicated to those who fought for our freedom. Many of those folks did not live to tell their own story. I would like future generations to understand who and what were Short Snorters and to keep the memories alive."


Sparks will be promoting Short Snorter notes throughout the show. He will give a Money Talks presentation at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 7, titled “The Short-Snorter Project: Still Keeping the Memories Alive” in Room E144. He will also exhibit a collection of Short Snorters at the show.


The Portland National Money Show features more than 500 numismatic dealers with extensive inventories; the ANA Museum Showcase, exhibiting some of the world's most valuable and beautiful coins and paper money; the Collector Exhibits area; and a wide range of educational presentations and seminars. Show hours are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 5, and Friday, March 6; and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 7. ANA members are admitted free, plus ANA members may enter the bourse 30 minutes before the public on Friday and Saturday. For more information, go to NationalMoneyShow.com.


The American Numismatic Association is a congressionally chartered nonprofit educational organization dedicated to encouraging people to study and collect money and related items. The ANA helps its 26,000 members and the public discover and explore the world of money through its vast array of education and outreach programs, as well as its museum, library, publications, conventions and seminars. For more information, call 719-632-2646 or go to www.money.org.


Release Date: February 27, 2015

ANA Contact: Jake Sherlock

          Phone: 719-482-9872

          Email: pr@money.org


old one dollar bill reverse with writing on it
old one dollar bill reverse with writing on it
old one dollar bill with writing on it
old one dollar bill with tape on it
old one dollar bill reverse with writing on it
old one dollar bill with writing on it
old one dollar bill reverse with writing on it
old one dollar bill reverse with writing on it
old one dollar bill with writing on it
old one dollar bill reverse with writing on it

Comments

user_7180

Level 5

Pretty cool effort. Great photos.

Mike

Level 7

I used to collect autographs of famous athletes. I would get them on a picture. This does not seem like collection to me. So they signed a buck. I would rather have a picture. That's just my opion

Dollar Guy

Level 5

"Short Snorters" was always something my father talked about earlier in my life he explained that almost everyone had one in his outfit. His side of it was that each time they were moved during the war he would come into contact with units of other nations and they would exchange currencies which were atached to form the short snorter with everyone signing it when they gathered. The fun part was that when they gathered at the local watering hole the short snorters came out and longest one's owner got a free drink. The last time I visited my Dad (he turns 96 on Sunday, March8) he commented that his short snorter would be mine when he visited the other side of green grass. I said I would lke to see it now but he said it was in the safety deposit box and out of touch. The one tid bit he added was that he was in a bar sometime later as in after the war and he encountered Jimmy Doolittle and had him sign it. I hate to say it but at his age he tends to "embellish" his war stories and I have afeeling this one of these cases. I mentioned it to his wife about the short snorter and she said "Oh, this is the first I heard of it." The point is that I relish his stories because not all of them are too far from the truth, and he is my Dad after all.

LNCS

Level 5

Very informative.

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