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05 Feb 2023

Filler and Fodder Coin Thoughts 1

| coinfodder

I don't have a special blog planned this week, so I decided to go away from a script and see where this blog takes me. Warning- the topics may get strange, but its me writing. Its honestly par for the course....Decided to use cash to buy a bit of candy a while back and got the first of the new American Women quarters. My reaction...mixed at best. I don't know, I just don't like them...they don't have the same artistic complexity as the National Park or 50State quarters...they just don't. Possibly, this is because I don't recognize 80% of the honorees. I recognize Celia Cruz from this year, but have I listened to any of her music? No. I don't know, this series is just, meh. It may because I was spoiled with my entrance into coin collecting, with the amazing design work for the National Park series (the mighty plethora of bird included). I'm frankly honestly bored of people being on it. Our coins need a shakeup.There seems to be a new call for artists for the AIP, 18 years after the first call for artists. I've been noticing a sharp downgrade in the originality of designs (THA BIRDS). The pitch...its interesting. Its professional, but we have the tattooedup Joe Menna, our 14th Chief Engraver, as the opening. Its a solid pitch, I will not lie. However, I just can't get over Joe Menna crossing his arms. Does he notice that by crossing his arms, our eyes are drawn to his to those very big muscles and his tattoos (well, this is coin thoughts, these are my opinions, this is my brainrot). Hopefully Menna uses his artistic talents to pick the right people for the program. Some of the designs are getting stale. We need more designs like the WWI commem, and less like, ya know, tha birds.Its seems weird to me that after David Ryder left, the mint release schedule paled out, and on the old 2022 schedule, there are no crazy reverse proofs or rare privy mark proofs. Either they have been ripped from the schedule to "hide the damage" or the new director doesn't do these crazy things. If the latter is true, we must wonder, man, David Ryder. Its been a while since we muttered his name. He ran the place like a business. Remember November 14th, 2019, the 2019-S Reverse Proof Silver Dollar? The 2020 V75 Privy Mark proofs, one of which only had a minted run of 1945 and is worth 11 fold its purchase price? All relics now. In a way, I miss it. Maybe Ryder believed that any press was good press. He used those crazy rare artificialrarities to bring news to the numismatic world. More people where entering Numismatics. The ANA blog was flowing. Times where good.That ends my rambling. Goodnight.

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04 Feb 2023

America's First Settlement

| Long Beard

It has been a few week's since my last blog, largely for a loss of what topic to cover, and as I sat pondering on a cold bleak mid-winter day, with thoughts of somewhere warm one appeared out of thin air. The images of the medal being that very topic, America's first and oldest settlement. Short of knowing what and where this is located, most likely Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts, Williamsburg Virginia or even Roanoke come to mind. In which case you'd be wrong. So the subject of this week's blog is sunny (and warm) Saint Augustine, Florida. Enjoy!

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04 Feb 2023

I Need Help With This Coin...

| user_84095

Hello everyone! It has been a while since I wrote a blog. I got this really confusing coin at the coin shop I work at. My boss had shown me the coin a few weeks earlier and had decided to give it to me. He said he had no clue what it was. I was so grateful and excited. I took a look at it under a microscope and every detail seemed right. The posture, composition, and weight. I did my research all over Google, eBay, and any other source to find any information. I have never seen this before. The rim has more of a curve to it and the overall size is bigger than the average copper penny. But the weight is the same. It is so confusing. The letters seem to be a lot thinner than a regular strike ( Such as the LIBERTY ). I am blessed to have such a kind boss who would give me something like this to cherish. It has been fun doing the research and I thank him for that. If any of you have ever seen this variety or error please comment below. Thanks!

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04 Feb 2023

Ten types of error coins part 2

| Anakin104

This is the second part of 'Ten types of error coins' so if you have not read that read it if you want. Join me while I continue to tell you about error coins.

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03 Feb 2023

Ten types of errors part 1

| Anakin104

Error coins are sought by numismatists frequently; Whether its by looking in your pocket change, searching the sidewalk, or just by looking anywhere, people are on constant search for rare coins, or really anything worth more than its face value . Here are five types of error coins people tend to try to find.A clipped planchet error is an incomplete coin, which is missing some of its metal. These result accidentally when the steel rods used to punch blanks out of a metal strip overlap a portion of already punched out metal. There is virtually many types of these errors. Coins with more than one single clip are usaully more than those with only one clip.When an off center strike contains at least two images, it is a multiple strike error. Like the clipped planchet error, values go higher with more images on one of these error coins. These occur when a finished coin goes back into the coin press and is struck with the dies again. Absence of the date will more often than not decrease the value of these error coins.A planchet blank or just blank, is another cool error coin. This is a piece of metal intended to be pressed with dies for a coin, but i stead is just left blank. Ones that contain a rim are worth less than the ones without because the weren't milled to upset the rim.A defective die error coin is an error that has suffered a die crack or a rim break , and causes a visible piece of raised metal. Coins that have barely noticeable die cracks are worth very very little or even nothing. For areas on which the die broke away, this produces an unstruck part of a defective die error coin known as cud.The last coin i will mention today is the off center error, which features an off center strike , resulting an areas that are left blank , because thes coins have been struck out of collar and are incorrectly centered, resulting with part of the design missing. These coin mistakes occur when the p.anchet does not enter the coining press correctly. Coins that are slightly ocf center and feature no missing design are called broadstrikes, which i will talk about in part two of this blog. Going back on the subject, those coins with nearly all of the impression missing are generally worth more, but those with a readable date and mi t are more valueble.Thank you for reading and I hope you will enjoy part two of this blog.

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03 Feb 2023

1976 $2 Bicentennial FRN

Paper Money-U.S. | AC coin$

The skip in renewed design did make people run to just mark or certify the newly printed note as a memo for thefuture. Still, nowadays there is a certain mystique surrounding this US paper-money denomination.

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03 Feb 2023

Finding a rotationally miss-aligned die large cent

Young Numismatists Exchange | The Error Collector

The ANA has several amazing youth programs that help young numismatists learn about coins and earn cool prizes, they include the Dollar Project, the Early American Copper Coin Project and the Ancient Coin Project. I completed the Dollar Project last year, and am now working on the Early American Copper Project. I completed the first section and received an 1854 Braided Hair large cent. To get the Matron Head large cent I had two write two blog posts, which I published here on the ANA website, and also get elected as an officer in my local coin club. I eagerly completed the requirements and sent in the form for the second coin. I received a Matron Head large cent for the second submission. The coin I got was an 1835 Matron Head large cent that graded VG-8. This grade is described in the Red Book as "LIBERTY, date, stars, and legends clear. Part of hair cord visible." This coin is worth about $30. I wondered about what it would have purchased back when it was minted. According to The Southwestern Historical Quarterly, October 1947 (p. 170), in 1835 a cent could buy about one 1/3 ounce of pork, 1 ounce of bacon and ½ ounce of sugar. This is quite a bit more than a cent can purchase today! I don't know of anything that I could buy with just one cent! My dad used to go buy penny candies for one cent, but nobody sells them anymore.

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02 Feb 2023

VAMs: What Are They?

Coins-United States | thatcoinguy

Many of us more advanced collectors know what a VAM is, but because this term has come up in blogs in the past (and will come up in blogs in the future *ominous foreshadowing*), I think it is important to educate new collectors or people who are unfamiliar with this term so that they can better understand and appreciate the blogs written by our members that collect coins by VAM.

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02 Feb 2023

Gold The New Counterfeit

Coins | Mike

Hi this is my second try on this blog or warning. I hope you all are doing well.As the title says there is a big push in fake gold. Not certified not from our mint or other mints. Im talking about affordable gold like below. .....Now I think these are great. They sell from one gram to one ounce and more. I wanted to buy a round coin from our mint. If I did that pay 2,500 dollars my buying power for the rest of the year would not be good. ....So I looked these up. I can buy a five ounce or ten ounce when I want. When I have a few extra dollars I can buy more. I looked the packaging and the company PAMP. A Swiss company known for there gold. ....But I also read about the counterfeiting. Its going on with PAMP and all the other bars. You cannot tell a fake from a real one. I don't care how good you are. They weigh the same. The packaging is identical. Even the front drawing Well PAMP jumped on this right away. The have a phone app. Every piece of gold has what they call a fingerprint. Something you can't see. One way of telling it may be fake the fake bar is thicker. The app does all six sides. Can't tell by the drawing. Packaging, not even the weight. You need an iPhone for this app. Other companies are coming up with them. PAMP came out in April. And it works great. There is a video on You tube just put in Veriscan they come up. They show the fakes from the real. The color is exactly the same. Now I was looking to buy gold but $2500 and taxes with prices going up I buy one coin and that's most of my budget. These you buy whenever you have some extra money.From one gram and up to an ounce. Other companies are trying to get a phone app. I always liked PAMP. So when I read About this I wasn't buying anyone's bars. Then I found the phone app. Its great. Even stores the cert number if your going to sell. Put two bars next to each other you can't tell you would be guessing. And you don't have to send it away. You check it from your house. Now I'm happy I can pick up some gold when I have some extra money. And to sell it is easy. You and the buyer have piece of mind. Veriscan is the name of the app. Im glad I read about it before I bought. So when you have some extra money. Buy from a known company not ebay. And own some gold. No more worrying. Take care and be safe. By the way there worth the same price as regular gold. You buy five grams you can buy 10 grams even 20 ounces. And its safe. I won't have that kind of money but it builds up so fast you will own your own ounce!.

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