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Anakin104's Blog

22 Dec 2021

Merry Christmas from the ANA

| Anakin104

For all you YNs , if you have recently submitted a blog for YN dollars, you may receive a 2022 to 2025 holder for historic women in American history, which the Hobbyist has mentioned in Coin roll hunting part 3.(It is how I got mine) It is a small coin folder for 5 new quarter designs, with one for each year. The quarters will portray Maya Angelou, Wilma Mankiller and many more,which is in the American Women Quarters collection. Also since this will probably be my last blog for this year, so I want to wish every numismatists in the ANA a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

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15 Dec 2021

What is your favorite Christmas movie?

| Anakin104

What is your favorite Christmas movie? I like a lot of them but my top 5 are ...1. Grinch 20002. Frosty the Snoman 20053. Grinch 20184. Jingle all the way 19965. Grinch 1957

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15 Dec 2021

Silver coins 1916 to 1964

| Anakin104

Numismatists collect anything coin related. They collect platinum, gold and silver coins, proof sets and regular coins put in circulation. In this article, i will talk about silver coins produced and released in 1916 to 1964 by the mint, excluding commemoratives, Peace dollars, Barber dimes and Kennedy half dollars.1st coin: Mercury Dime 1916 to 1964Designed by sculptor and designer Adolph A. Weinman, this coin depicts a young Liberty, with a Phrygian cap with wings, was confused with Mercury, hence the nickname the Mercury dime. Weinman is said to have based the Mercury dime off of lawyer and poet Wallace Steven's wife, Elsie Stevens. The obverse shows a fasces, signifying unity and strength, and an olive branch for peace. It was put in silver from 1916 to 1945, and gold in 2016.2nd coin: Standing Liberty Quarter 1916 to 1930The Standing Liberty Quarter depicts the Goddess Liberty. It was designed by Herman Atkins MacNeil, and was changed shortly after being put in circulation for showing basically a bare breast of Liberty. After being modified to not show a bare breast, they also added chain mail and in 1925 started to make a stronger strike since the age wore off too quickly after just being put in circulation.3rd coin: Washington QuarterTo celebrate the 200th anniversary of Washingtons birth, the Mint decided to create a new coin for our first president. The Mint chose the design of John Flanagan. The Washington Quarter replaced the Standing Liberty Quarter. Flanagans original reverse, which stayed for 66 years until getting changed in 1999 for the new National Park set.4th coin : Jefferson Nickel 1942 to 1945As nickel was a much needed metal in World War II, the Mint used the not needed or not so much needed metal silver instead . This coin was designed by Felix O. Schlag, whose design lasted 67 years until getting changed in 2005. Its mintmark is located above the Monticello, which was Jefferson's home. It was put in some silver in the three year period.5th coin: Roosevelt dime 1946 to 1964 Since the introduction, this coin has been circulating since 1946, but stopped being silver in 1965. The metal that is currently used to make dimes is called base metal. When first put in circulation, the designer John Sinnock put his initials JS, but people thought it was Joseph Stalin, which created a craze.6th coin: Franklin half dollar 1948 to 1963This 50 cent piece depicts Founding Father, inventor and statesman Benjamin Franklin. The obverse depicts the Liberty Bell, and the coin was designed by John Sinnock. The Sesquincentennial dollar coin in 1926 was the basis of the idea to put the Liberty Bell on the back of the half dollar.In 1941, the Mint had the idea of putting Franklin on the dime, and they even made a design, but was later forgotten and did not happen.

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14 Dec 2021

The history of the Red and Blue Book

Coins-United States | Anakin104

For many years, new coin collectors are wondering how to get the information they need to know about their new hobby. The Blue Book, which has been here since 1942, and the a Red Book, which has been here since 1946, have been helping coin collecting for 75 to 79 years and counting. In this article, I will talk about the history of the Red and Blue book.Ist book: The Blue BookOriginally named the Handbook of United States Coins, was later changed to the Blue Book, because of its nickname because of its blue cover. The Blue Book, was introduced to the world in 1942 by Richard S. Yeoman and Whitman Publishing, tells the possible amount of money you could earn by selling your numismatic treasures. All money that you could possibly earn depends on condition,mintmark and year. In 2022, the Blue Book will celebrate 79 years of information about American coins. This book covers buying offers. From early American coins to National Park Quarters, colonial American coins to U.S Mint products, there is practically no coin this book doesn't cover with buying offers.2nd book: The Red BookOriginally known to the world as the Guide Book of United States Coins, had a similar situation like the Blue Book and its name. A nickname of a book now a trademarked name, it is now the Red Book because of its red cover. The Red Book covers the retail price of your coins. It lists the price of colonial coins to circulating coins, proof sets and even Red Book prices! It also includes water tokens, commemoratives and Phillipine issues. The prices go off of grade, mintmark and year. The Red Book is the longest coin price guide, with over 24 million copies sold.Red Book vs Blue BookThe Red Book covers the retail price of your coins, what you can expect to pay for the coin desired. The Blue Book covers the wholesale price, the price you could expect to get from a dealer , coin shop or wherever you buy your coins. Also, the Blue Book, the less popular coin book, sells for around 10 to 12 dollars. The more popular Red Book sells for around 16 to 20 dollars. (This is also the buying range and some copies will cost more because of rarity and such) The last and easiest way to tell them apart is there colors. One is Red and one is Blue. Red Book and Blue Book nowR. S Yeoman retired from being the editor in 1970, 18 years before his death. He left Kenneth Bressett in charge as editor. Bressett, the former assistant of R.S Yeoman, who retired in 2017, passed the baton to Jeff Garrett . Jeff is now currently the editor of both the Red and Blue books, and Bressett is now the editor emeritus. Also Q. David Bowers has served as the senior editor in the Deluxe edition of the Red Book since 2018.

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11 Dec 2021

Any thoughts on this coin?

| Anakin104

I do not know what these marks are? Got any ideas on what it is ? Is it just wear?, because it is 115 years old.

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11 Dec 2021

Queen Elizabeth II on Canadian Pennies

| Anakin104

For almost 70 years , Queen Elizabeth the second has appeared on Canadian coinage. The coins first started with Queen Victoria in 1858 , it is still going with Queen Elizabeth in 2021.Her portrait first was introduced in 1953, and is still in work. In this article, I will talk about the history of Queen Elizabeth the second on Canadian coinage. 1st designIn 1953, with the introduction of Queen Elizabeth the second as the monarch, the Royal Mint of London set of to work to create the first design for the new queen. Designed by Mary Gillick, it had minor difficulties and mess-ups. It portrayed the young Queen with nothing on her head, and lasted twelve years before get a new design soon after. It was put in circulation in seven countries. It was notable for a simple bust that showed shoulders, since no other monarch on a coin showed shoulders beside Queen Victoria's coins. All the other monarchs head were cut off at the neck. 2nd designIn 1965, engraver Arnold Machin created a new design for the queen. It showed a tiara on Queen Elizabeth II. It showed a more detailed head and had a new reverse in 1967 , which marked the centennial of Canadian independence. The reverse showed a rock dove since it was part of a wildlife collection. It was used for almost two decades and is said to be the Queens favorite. 3rd designIn 1990, Queen Elizabeth head changed again as she aged. Designed by Dora de Pédery-Hunt , it shows a open crown on her head and a mature head, which is slightly different than the ones from Great Britain. In Britain, this coin was designed by Rapheal Maklouf. 4th designRe- Designed again for the last time in present day, it was switched with the design created by Sussanna Blunt. It portrays a grandmotherly head of the queen, which she is also bare headed as she neared the age of 80 years of age. This Bust was based off of a photograph.6 FUN FACTS about Queen Elizabeth II:1. Queen Elizabeth the second has appeared on more coins than any other monarch so far.2. Longest reigning monarch in British history.3. In the 1953 Silver coronation coin, Queen Elizabeth II appears on horseback.4. In 1997, the Rank-Broadley design was used in Britain, instead of the soon to be used Sussana Blunts design.5. In Canada, the Blunt design is used today, but in Britain they use the Clark bust.6. In the UK, the only person to drive without a license is Queen Elizabeth the secondSources: Coins and Paper Money by Allen G.Berman and Google Search

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01 Dec 2021

Coin related items in cereal part 2

| Anakin104

In my most recent article , which is the same subject as this article , it will be mostly same intro as the first part.Many adults now regret not begging their parents to buy the Cocoa or Fruity Pebbles, that had a what could be very expensive coin, if in good condition. Bah! Who wants a coin? They thought. Wouldn't they want a toy or some other gadget instead? Now those same adults realize the mistake that could have put thousands in their pockets.This article is about coins or coin related items placed in either Post or General Mills cereal boxes. 1970 to 1980 (Sorry guys, when I was researching about these coins they had no specific date on them ) In the 1970s to 1980s, Post put in presidential coins in their Super Sugar Quisp cereal boxes as a prize. The coins state the presidents name, year in office, and some fun facts, along with having their portrait. Also put in Post's Super Sugar Quisp were more coin, only now they were legal tender , which were coins from the countries Brazil, Egypt, Finland and South Korea, the list goes on. The Brazilian coin was a dime, the Egyptian a Millimue, the South Korean was one Won and the one from Finland was one Penni. Again with Post, and again legal tender, banknotes were given as cereal prizes, from countries from Brazil to Indonesia. It makes you wonder, why would Post give out coins and currency as cereal prizes? They were basically giving out a whole collection out there! The reason is simple, the rarer or bigger the prize, the more customers Post would get! The prices for the presidential coins are around three dollars, the foreign coins around five dollars and the banknotes five to ten dollars. 1975 to 1980 Again, Post put a coin holder in their cereal , portraying three characters from the Flinstones, which are probably the most popular characters from Hanna-Barbera classic 60s cartoon. They used the heads of Fred Flintstone, Barney Rubble and their pet dinosaur as the shapes of the coin holders. Since Post was using Flintstone characters, they put these coin holder collectibles in Cocoa Pebbles and Fruity Pebbles, probaly for two reasons, so sales on Cocoa and Fruity Pebbles to go up, and because it made sense. The colors to collect are orange, red, blue and yellow. Personally, I think Post had a genius idea on this prize, which linked three of my favorite things, coins, a classic cartoon and cereal. Even though discontinued after only running for five years, these plastic coin holders have remained extremely popular and extremely cheap. Prices go from two dollars and ninety nine cents to to ten dollars, but prices vary from the color and if it is faded. Sources : Mr . Breakfast Worthpoint Paper Money ForumGoogle Search Ebay Time Passage Nostalgia Flashbak Big Red Toy Box

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