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Oobie's Blog

15 Dec 2020

Goertz Daler Variety 9: 1718 Phoebus - Three-Lined & Four-Lined Reverse

Young Numismatists Exchange | Oobie

Another variety has been found to add to my growing list. I have spotted several while browsing through images of possible purchases but taking the time to catalog them is a different story. This variety occurs on the 1718 Phoebus Goertz daler, specifically on the reverse. I happened to come across this variety when I was looking through coin auctions online. I typically find these varieties through the exact same thing; I look around online at current auctions or availabilities, and I come across a piece that holds a trait that varies from other pieces I have observed. Finding these varieties is difficult sometimes, but it is also very rewarding.

As I mentioned before, this variety occurs on the reverse of the 1718 Phoebus Goertz daler. I have struggled to find a word to describe what the design detail is supposed to be rather than a decorative element, so I will do my best to describe the location. On the reverse of the daler, the stated value is surround by an oval. On the left and right sides of the oval are single flowers, which have a curved design element above and below them. This curved design element is where the design varies. One variety of the Phoebus daler has four lines connecting the two curves that form the larger curve, while others have three lines. As I said, I am struggling to find the words to describe this variety, so I hope you can view the attached images and see exactly what I am writing about. I have looked through several images of the Phoebus daler and have seen many four-lined curves, as well as many three-lined curves, so I can assume that the two varieties are both quite common. Since I have absolutely no clue what this design feature is called, I have decided to call them the Three-Lined Reverse and the Four-Lined Reverse. The odd thing about these varieties is that most of the reverse design elements stay the same between the two attached images, except the lines on the curves. This seems rather odd because in previously discovered varieties, there are usually a few more features that vary from one another. Nonetheless, if one feature varies, it is considered a variety.

This write-up has been rather rough due to my inability to find a name for the design feature, so I sincerely hope you understood what I was writing about. If you did not, but you wish to, please feel free to contact me, and I will do my absolute best to help you understand. I apologize for the roughness, but if the variety exists, I want to document it, no matter how rough it may be to describe. Thank you for reading, and I hope you enjoyed. I will be writing another blog tonight about another variety I found on the obverse of the Saturnus daler, so you will be seeing another blog from me tonight.

-Gabe, a.k.a. Oobie

Comments

Mal_ANA_YN

Level 5

Great work with digging into the details and sharing the information.

Kepi

Level 6

That's great! You are really good at finding these varieties! Keep up the good work ; )

It's Mokie

Level 6

I guess that varieties are very common due to the somewhat primitive means made to create dies back in the 18th Century (and prior). Have these varieties been published?

Oobie

Level 4

That would be correct. The engraver would have to engrave a new die each time one was replaced, so the varieties are very common, especially on coins with high mintages. I’ve been wondering how many varieties I could find to figure out how many dies were used. There is only one variety that is recognized by NGC, and there has been one other Swedish individual that I know of that has studied varieties on these coins. The varieties I write about are personal discoveries unless I just haven’t found where someone else had already discovered them.

CoinHunter

Level 5

Great blog, nice coin!

Mike

Level 7

Great blog. I like these coins also. As you know I collect tokens from the 1700's. I found many varieties. But NGC will not notice them because of how the tokens were made with the equipment back then. They were poorly made. I didn't think so. . Also on a 1609. I enjoy them any way. . Keep them coming!!

Stumpy

Level 5

Great and informative blog oh great and informative Oz! I enjoy reading about and seeing these coins. They are fascinating! I really, really like the first one you have! Later !

Coin Keeper

Level 4

How can you keep up with all of these varieties????????????? :) I enjoyed you blog!

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Your academic prowess is amazing and gratifying to read about! Keep going!

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Your academic prowess is amazing and gratifying to observe!

"SUN"

Level 6

It is nice you are getting some varieties for your collection.

I don't feel so bad about my drawing with this particular design lol. Great work Oobie! I would have missed this completely.

Golfer

Level 5

I really like these coins. Amazing that you are finding these varieties and also collect them. I want to find one now. Thanks for all the blogs and information. Very interesting area.

CentSearcher

Level 5

Wow, that first one is yours? Nice! If only I was a bit more interesting I would be collecting something unique like that instead of the popular and common lincoln cent. I am not saying lincoln cents aren't cool, just that Goertz Daler coins are a nice and unique series. Thanks for the update!

TheNumisMaster

Level 5

Another one to add to the list! That list must be about as long as a Target receipt by now! lol Keep up that good work!

walking liberty

Level 4

That looks like a nice coin to get! Hope you are able to get it. Wl

Oobie

Level 4

The first image actually is my coin, so thank you!

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