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2000D roosevelt dime with two Ds?

I found a 2000D roosevelt dime that appears to have a faded D punched off to the right of the actual mint mark. Anyone ever hear of this, or am I seeing things. You can see it with the naked eye

7 years ago

Could you post a picture?

7 years ago

I've tried to get a good picture but they all come out blurry, but the extra D is off to the right.

7 years ago

Try checking the Red Book or Coins Magazine. Maybe they have it listed.

7 years ago

thanks will do

7 years ago

You can also try looking in the Cherrypickers Guide. They might have it as a variety.

7 years ago

RPM, Re-punched Mintmark, it is a popular error (I think), and some are identified, like the 1866 Shield Nickel RPM.

7 years ago

not to burst any bubbles but it is not possible for it to be an RPM.  It is most likely the result of the coin having been struck by a worn die.


Here is why it cant be.....by 1991 or so all mint marks were included as a part of the design at the original design phase of production.  Mint marks were engraved into the master hub.  There was no more punching of mint marks into dies any mmore, hence no repunched mint marks.

The few occasions where mint marks could be doubled from 1991 on occurred on doubled dies such as the 1995 D DDO Lincoln cents.  On those, the die was doubled and the D was doubled as a result of the actual die doubling.  In thqt case, the date was also doubled as was some of the peripheral details on the obverse.

7 years ago

A coupla other notes.  1866 nickels had no mint marks as they were all struck in Philadelphia.  So there ain't no such creature as an 1866 RPM nickel


The Redbook lists few die varieties but they are adding more each year.
The CPG will list major die varieties and not all of them.

7 years ago

thanks for all the great input. I'm still gonna hang onto it and see about maybe getting an expert look at it one day, if nothing else I got a extra *D* on a dime that I got as change lol

7 years ago
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