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Coin Roll Hunting

Oh yeah, Nachos10 - Hang on to those 95% Cu cents! I have an artillery shell box nearly full of 'em, and I'm just waiting for the day when they'll be worth much more. I guess we just have to be patient - more patient than all those people before us who saved all their silver coins from circulation in the 1960's. They say "bad money drives out good money." It has happened a few times in our nation's history (ie, the Hard Times in the 1830's, Civil War era tokens and fractional currency, et cetera.) So yes, great idea to hang on to the Copper cents right now, and let people laugh at you for doing this if they want to - you can do your own laughing too one day - as you're headed to the bank!

7 years ago

I plan to exactly do that! *high fives you*

7 years ago

@Numinerd9 Do you hoard nickels?

7 years ago

@nachos10
@Numinerd9 Do you hoard nickels?

I have in the past, but it got too expensive for me! lol

I actually heard a story about a millionaire who was hoarding a LOT of them in a warehouse in Texas (don't know if it's true or not; could just be a numismatic urban legend.) My understanding was that he purchased $1 million in face value in just nickels, in the hopes that the US gov't. would one day remonetize them, and re-value each US five cent coin (aka "nickels") at ten cents each, thereby doubling his money. Again, not sure if it's true, but when you consider that the five cent coins we use are actually only 25% nickel and 75% copper, maybe he's onto something? Who knows.

7 years ago

Ive heard about that too. But I agree with you on the cost part. Pennies are fine but nickels are too costly.

7 years ago

I mainly collect nickels, so I mainly search for nickels. I have searched about $2500-$3000 in nickels and I have found about 15 Buffalo Nickels, 5 of which were dateless, the best were a VG 1927 and a VF 1936-D. I have found 15 War Nickles, I have found 5 1938 Jefferson's; one of which was in XF-45 condtition. I also have found 25 1939 nickels, including 1 1939-S, I have found all clad (not proof) 'S' Mintmark Nickels. My best find of all coin roll hunting was an AG-3+ 1903 V Nickel.

7 years ago

Hi All,


Of course you all know that I am a roll searcher and I've been writing about my exploits for about 15 years now.

I have to , unfortunately burst a bubble.  The 1970S cent shown at the beginning of this thread is not a doubled die.  

It is a prime example of a coin exhibiting machine doubling which unfortunately is extremely common and without a premium.

The doubling on the coin is flat and shelflike.  The mintmark and date are equally doubled (an obvious sign of machine doubling) Let me explain.  In 99.999% of machine doubled coins with mintmarks, both the date and the mintmark exhibit doubling since they are usually equally effected by the hop or twist of the die that caused the doubling.  If you look closely at the images, you can see that the doubling is flat and shelflike.  It is the result of metal having been moved by a slight twist of the die when the coin was struck.

Back to the date/mintmark issue.  Until the 1990s,  the mintmark was added to the die by hand using a punch.  That means that the date, if it were struck by a doubled die would be doubled, while the mintmark would not.  

There are some exceptions prior to the 1990s but this isn't one of them.

I'm writing this on a relatively new tablet so I don't have all my images on here to show you what a doubled die looks like, but a doubled die (with few exceptions) shows the doubling as rounded duplication of the doubled details.  Even on DDs with what is known as a close spread, the doubling is evidenced by a rounded , raised version of the doubled details.

Having seen thousands of doubled dies and hundreds of thousands examples of machine doubling, Please take my word for it.

Doubled dies are often confusing to understand but doubling effects can be caused by about a dozen reasons other that the die being doubled.

Bill O'

7 years ago

My son and I went through more than 150,000 cents in rolls or bags of 5000 that our bank let us look through (from their coin machine). 


Found and saved a good amount of wheaties and copper cents. 

7 years ago

I enjoy hunting nickels. You can find silver, San Francisco's, buffaloes, rare dates, and more!!! After hunting $3000 or so, I found a 1903 V Nickel, 15 buffaloes and 25 war nickels. I have found a 1939-S and an AU 1940 nickel as well.

7 years ago

I don't go for copper cents, only copper wheat cents.

7 years ago
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