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Holy Grail

My "holy grail" coin would be the Eliasberg 1913 Liberty Head Nickel. Not sure what would be the holy grail in my current set. I have many that I have Cherry Picked over the years, so it would be one of these.

7 years ago

@LNCS
My "holy grail" coin would be the Eliasberg 1913 Liberty Head Nickel. Not sure what would be the holy grail in my current set. I have many that I have Cherry Picked over the years, so it would be one of these.
 Good luck on the Eliasberg!

7 years ago

My favorite coin, for now, is 1935 Peace Dollar. It's a farely common coin with a mintage of over 1.5 million. This coin is special to me because of its toning. I have a thing for toned coins. Mostly Morgan and Peace dollars. This one has an almost smokey apperience. Going to look great in my collection.

My "Grail" coin is 1861-D Half Eagle. That's "D" for Dahlonega not Denver. It has a listed mintage of only 1,597. Who knows how many survive today. 

7 years ago

@Longstrider

My favorite coin, for now, is 1935 Peace Dollar. It's a farely common coin with a mintage of over 1.5 million. This coin is special to me because of its toning. I have a thing for toned coins. Mostly Morgan and Peace dollars. This one has an almost smokey apperience. Going to look great in my collection.

My "Grail" coin is 1861-D Half Eagle. That's "D" for Dahlonega not Denver. It has a listed mintage of only 1,597. Who knows how many survive today. 

 

Very cool, Longstrider. Thanks for sharing!

7 years ago

@Longstrider

My favorite coin, for now, is 1935 Peace Dollar. It's a farely common coin with a mintage of over 1.5 million. This coin is special to me because of its toning. I have a thing for toned coins. Mostly Morgan and Peace dollars. This one has an almost smokey apperience. Going to look great in my collection.

My "Grail" coin is 1861-D Half Eagle. That's "D" for Dahlonega not Denver. It has a listed mintage of only 1,597. Who knows how many survive today. 

Excellent grail piece, Longstrider! (You have chosen wisely.) Not too long after I started working here at the ANA HQ, we received a very generous donation of some great Morgan Dollars and US gold. I couldn't resist, I had to go check these out in the museum office to see what had come in. When I got there, one of the employees told me to hold out my hand. He placed a beautiful, Unc. 1861 half eagle in my hand and when I turned it over to check out the reverse, I almost fell to my knees when I saw that "D" under the eagle. I've never been fortunate enough to handle too much Dahlonega gold (other than the small pieces I've pulled out of the ground there while prospecting) but I don't know how many better Dahlonega gold coins than that one, that I'll ever be able to hold in my life! (Yeah, working for the ANA has a couple of perks, I suppose! lol) BTW, if you can visit the gold museum in downtown Dahlonega, check out their display of gold coins - they have what I think is probably the finest known 1861-D Dollar; I have yet to see a nicer specimen.

7 years ago

I think my Holy Grail started back when i was a teenager and the local club had a rule that you had to be 18 to be a member otherwise you were just a visitor. At that time i thought the "coin" was the 3 legged Buffalo Nickel and I would have given my eye teeth for one then, A older member in his 60's who always seemed to have the strangest stuff in mind, sat next to me at a meeting and I told my "grail story"  and behold he came up with one out of his pocket and he proceeded to pick my modest collection of Mercury dimes apart taking all of my 1920 - 1924 P-D-S coins as a suggested trade. I was so dumbfounded that the 3 legger was going to be mine I did it with gusto. not two meetings later I was showing my trade off to a dealer and he pronounced it a fake. I then confronted the old man at the next meeting and I was told "that is the way it goes" and I went right to the club president and he said "that is the reason we do not let kids into the club" but the trade stood and I was out the dimes. By the way i still have the nickel and use it to remind myself not to get to "grail" oriented again.   

7 years ago

@$guy
I think my Holy Grail started back when i was a teenager and the local club had a rule that you had to be 18 to be a member otherwise you were just a visitor. At that time i thought the "coin" was the 3 legged Buffalo Nickel and I would have given my eye teeth for one then, A older member in his 60's who always seemed to have the strangest stuff in mind, sat next to me at a meeting and I told my "grail story"  and behold he came up with one out of his pocket and he proceeded to pick my modest collection of Mercury dimes apart taking all of my 1920 - 1924 P-D-S coins as a suggested trade. I was so dumbfounded that the 3 legger was going to be mine I did it with gusto. not two meetings later I was showing my trade off to a dealer and he pronounced it a fake. I then confronted the old man at the next meeting and I was told "that is the way it goes" and I went right to the club president and he said "that is the reason we do not let kids into the club" but the trade stood and I was out the dimes. By the way i still have the nickel and use it to remind myself not to get to "grail" oriented again.   
VERY UNFORTUNATE.  IMHO THE "OLD MAN" SHOULD HAVE BEEN KICKED OUT OF THE CLUB AND YOUR CLUB "PRESIDENT" IMPEACHED.  GLAD YOU DIDN'T LEAVE THE HOBBY OVER THIS.  MOST CLUBS ARE MUCH MORE PROFESSIONAL.

7 years ago

@Numinerd9 Thanks for the comments. You are my hero, working for the ANA. I Can't imagine holding that coin in my hand.

7 years ago

@Longstrider
@Numinerd9 Thanks for the comments. You are my hero, working for the ANA. I Can't imagine holding that coin in my hand.
Thanks, buddy! Yeah, I won't forget holding that particular piece of Dahlonega gold anytime soon, believe me. And it's members like you that are some of my heroes - what would the ANA be but a pile of coins and notes and books, if it weren't for the members?

7 years ago

Agreed. How about these other holy grail pieces?

7 years ago
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