Login

More useful insight

The term "rare" gets floated around every so often, and in more case than not, the word is highly misunderstood. For discussions, mintage figures ( more specifically sold numbers as many of what remained at the mint met the melting pot ). Here in the United States, coins such as all those West Point quarters and certain American Silver Eagles sell for huge markup over issue. Others, such as the 1909s vdb Lincoln or 1916d Winged Liberty for their low total mintage. But what if I could show you hundreds of coins that had production figures with less than 5% of those mentioned and affordable on any budget? The most expensive less than $400, most less than $100. Oh, and a perfect grade of MS/PF 70. Impossible? Look beyond our borders. I'm lacking only seven of the Australian Wedge-Tailed Silver Eagles, PCGS and NGC graded 70's. The 2014 low relief proof, mintage 4,037, being the most expensive thus far set me back $350.00. (PCGS pop of 85) Only two coins in the entire series beginning in 2014 and running current have a mintage above 10,000  Nearly all of the 24 coin series (three finishes) are below 5,000.


Other countries have similar scenarios, so if your looking for a true rarity, look abroad. Remember, if it has a mintage of 5,000 then only that many people world-wide could own one. And that's a win no matter how you look at it.

1 month ago

yeah, last month at the Dalton Coin Show, i got a Vatican BU 1939 10 Centeismi coin, with a mintage of 64K, for $4. insane, i know.

1 month ago

Not to mention that the word "rare" is thrown around a lot by coin dealers and companies (HSN and Littleton) as an excuse to sell them at ridiculous markups. Ahem. The great rare low-mintage 2019-w Silver Eagle Reverse Proof (the POTN's Set) with the Canadian maple Leaf for ... 300 dollars. And I am still waiting for Littleton to buzz up the 2019-S Reverse Proof ASE. What words (rare or otherwise) would they use for that?  

1 month ago

My conclusion is that people, especially dealers, look at popularity first then base the term after the fact. Which in most instance is far from accurate.

1 month ago
We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.