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1884 Silver half dollars

I inherited two 1884 silver half dollars. I am concerned about using local coin shops because our town is pretty small.  How can I best obtain a good appraisal?

2 years ago

I would reccomend checking out the ANA dealer directory; these are dealers who have to abide by standards set by the ANA, thus should be trustworthy, and reliable.


https://coin-dealer-directory.money.org/ (this is the link to the search page)

2 years ago

As with all coins, the value is dependent on the condition of the coin.  An 1884 Half Dollar could be worth just a few hundred in lower conditon up to thousands in MS condition.  So you need to find a copy of the ANA Grading Standards or Photograde and give them an honest evaluation. Factors like cleaning or environmental damage, will also effect the value so a MS Details (impaired) coin is typically sold for about two grades or more lower.  Say at the VF or XF level.   Lots and Lots of factors, I would take it to an ANA registered dealer and let them evaluate the coins if I am not personally knowledgeable about the series or coin surfaces/grades.

2 years ago

Look on auction sites and coin value listing sites. Coins are graded 1 to 70. Check on EBAY for the same coin in similar condition. Even a redbook will tell you the retail values for all grades. You can get a very close idea on retail  value without a dealer. I would get them certified by a grading service if they are valuable. 

2 years ago

I go to the NGC verafacation app. It tells you about the coin and has the price . The P.C. S . Most of the time doesnt have the price.

2 years ago

Here is a trick I tell non members to do when they have coins and want to know the value. I send them to Barnes and Nobel with their list of denominations and dates and a notebook. I have them find the Red Book and find their coin then look for the price jumps to see if they have those dates. That way they know they have a valuable coin that needs extra care in preserving so they tend to take better care of it and not lose it. In your case, being a member you should have a grading standard book and the Red Book in your coin library. If you do not have these  consider buying the most current edition of either the ANAs Official Grading Standards or Photograde or buy both and the Red Book. I personally bought all three to upgrade my library as my ANA grading book was over 10 years old and my Red Book was 5 years old. This will allow you to grade the coin and find a value yourself. Also the website has a grading game where they show you pictures and you have to guess the grade. That could be another way to grade the coin using the ANA's "photograde" system! If you get a copy of the Numismatist sent to your home find the most recent issue with the CDN Coin Price Guide for your denomination. If you do not get the paper copy, use the website to view the digital version. I used both of these to buy coins at the 2019 National Money Show and found the prices to be somewhat close to what I actually paid most of the time coming in under the values listed. Go to the coin shops in your area and just look at their inventory which you grade in your head. This will give you practice and you get a feel for how accurate their grading is compared to your own. Maybe they grade high or low or maybe you are grading high or low.  Another benefit is that you can establish a relationship with the dealer and maybe feel safe enough to provide a little more information about your collection to the dealer over time. They in turn get to know you and have the chance to develop a new client. Building a trustful relationship with a dealer is a good to way to build your collection at a reasonable price. As you buy more items, usually a dealer will cut a break to a long time valued customer and be willing to search for coins you need at shows you can't get to. It may not be much but he may sell you a coin for 35% markup versus 40% to anyone else.

2 years ago
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