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Nickel with no eyes

Hello,
I am quite new not only to collecting, but to the ANA as well. This is my first post. I am hoping someone can answer a question for me. I have recently found a 2016 Jefferson nickel that has a very weak left eye (right side as I look at the coin) and no right eye at all. The socket is there, just not the eyeball. That area is flat and mirror like. My question is this. Is a weak strike also considered an error like a double die or something similar would be? I know it is an oddity, but is it worth anything is what I am trying to find out.

4 years ago

Hello and welcome! It appears your five cent piece was struck by a die that had a little bit of dirt and/or grease (aka Mint goop) that found its way into that part of the die. When some of this goop gets trapped in parts of a coin die, that portion of the design is not able to strike up fully due to the space/void in the die being filled in. These are relatively common errors - but it's a great sign for your future cherrypicking endeavors! If you have a talent for spotting minor differences on coins, it should be much easier to spot the more significant ones over time. More often than not, an "error" such as yours is considered so small/insignificant that it won't really bring any premiums if you attempted to sell it. With filled die errors, the value largely comes from just how much of the original design is obscured; the more missing design elements, the higher the price - usually. --Sam Gelberd, ANA Numismatic Educator.

4 years ago

Hi Mike here welcome to the best hobby in the world. If I can help let me know. Well the previous answer is on what we say on the money. You might want to buy a book called the cherry pickers Guide. It lists all the varieties up to the nickel. Volume Two does the half dime and up. Sharp eye picking that up. Enjoy and have fun .mike




4 years ago

Thank you both for your replies. Kind words, indeed. I have many questions to be honest, but am learning more each day. I belong to the Knights of Columbus and we hold "Tootsie Roll" drives at least 6 weekends out of each year. We collect donations and as part of that I paid bills for the coins collected. $200.00 dollars of mixed coins. This nickel was one of them. Thank you for the explanation of how it occurred. I also found a Roosevelt dime that has a smaller dimension than a normal dime and is thicker along the outer rim. Looks almost like it was curled in/rolled a bit. All of the inside details are there, but much closer to the rim. I do not have a pic of it yet, but if you would like to see it I will have one taken. What confuses me the most is that to the best of my knowledge, the dime is the smallest coin so I don't see how it is a mint error, but yet why would anyone want to curl/roll a dime.  

4 years ago

@user_27121
Thank you both for your replies. Kind words, indeed. I have many questions to be honest, but am learning more each day. I belong to the Knights of Columbus and we hold "Tootsie Roll" drives at least 6 weekends out of each year. We collect donations and as part of that I paid bills for the coins collected. $200.00 dollars of mixed coins. This nickel was one of them. Thank you for the explanation of how it occurred. I also found a Roosevelt dime that has a smaller dimension than a normal dime and is thicker along the outer rim. Looks almost like it was curled in/rolled a bit. All of the inside details are there, but much closer to the rim. I do not have a pic of it yet, but if you would like to see it I will have one taken. What confuses me the most is that to the best of my knowledge, the dime is the smallest coin so I don't see how it is a mint error, but yet why would anyone want to curl/roll a dime.  
Even without being able to see it, it seems to me as if you found a dime that got caught in a clothes dryer machine. The exposure to extreme heat and centripetal force will do that to a lot of coins, given enough time in the dryer. Feel free to forward me pics and I'll see if that's what's really the issue here, but that's what it sounds like to me! -Sam Gelberd, ANA Numismatic Educator (sgelberd@money.org)

4 years ago
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