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What is this coin

I just fund this nickel coin and wonder what it is. It has two heads sides with different date. Part of it can easily be remove and seems that have been glued previously. I'm far to be a specialist and wonder if this could be a counterfeit coin??? I yes why a nickel? Can somebody help me with that. Thanks.

Treb

8 years ago

I have a 1941 two headed cent in my collection that is exactly the same type of machine work. It really takes a skilled machinist to drill out the coin and then inset the second piece. If you also look on the learning channnel and watch the program about making a buck, your see a machinist making copies of the famous Sacagewa-Washington mule that he sells for $9.95. 

8 years ago

Hi Guy, thanks for your answer. Does it worth anything?

8 years ago

@user_9669
I just fund this nickel coin and wonder what it is. It has two heads sides with different date. Part of it can easily be remove and seems that have been glued previously. I'm far to be a specialist and wonder if this could be a counterfeit coin??? I yes why a nickel? Can somebody help me with that. Thanks.

Treb
These types of alterations are done using two genuine coins, so it's not technically "counterfeit," just severely manipulated. Someone took two genuine Jefferson nickels and machined them in such a manner to remove the reverses, and create what appears to be a two-headed coin. These types of errors are next to impossible to happen legitimately, due to the way the dies are oriented in the presses. These are commonly referred to as "magician's coins." They usually go for a few dollars retail in most magic specialty shops, but lack any real collector/numismatic value. (But their value in helping you win coin tosses is unlimited - as long as nobody notices you're using one!)

8 years ago

Thank you Numinerd, I'll keep that in mind. May be I'll get a better average at the coin toss.

Treb

8 years ago

More likely than not, if the two obverses ("heads" sides) are both common dates, the coin was never meant to fool collectors. It was probably made as a novelty for the purpose of doing tricks, or possibly for making rigged coin tosses that always come up "heads." Its value is in its novelty, making it an interesting conversation piece, though for numismatic purposes, it's a common coin that has been altered.

8 years ago

Here is one events  that is probably all not that uncommon an item that is not what it is supposed to be maybe.  I was bidding on a lot of 4 Byzantine bronzes to add to my personal collection of examples of all sorts of coins from all over. three of the four turned out to be just what they were advertised. The fourth turned out to be a counterstamped 1655 Maravides that was issued as a IIII then counterstamped to become a VI. Which made a for a little show and tell at the last premeeting meal before the coin club meeting. So I thought I would share.

8 years ago

@Numinerd9
@user_9669
I just fund this nickel coin and wonder what it is. It has two heads sides with different date. Part of it can easily be remove and seems that have been glued previously. I'm far to be a specialist and wonder if this could be a counterfeit coin??? I yes why a nickel? Can somebody help me with that. Thanks.

Treb
These types of alterations are done using two genuine coins, so it's not technically "counterfeit," just severely manipulated. Someone took two genuine Jefferson nickels and machined them in such a manner to remove the reverses, and create what appears to be a two-headed coin. These types of errors are next to impossible to happen legitimately, due to the way the dies are oriented in the presses. These are commonly referred to as "magician's coins." They usually go for a few dollars retail in most magic specialty shops, but lack any real collector/numismatic value. (But their value in helping you win coin tosses is unlimited - as long as nobody notices you're using one!)
 I would say "Kudos" to the machinist his skills exhibit achievemnt but as a numismatist I wish it had not been done.


7 years ago

Here's one for the books. I was at my at the summer seminar for the second time and was taking a course on minting errors and Minting processes and had a field trip  going to the Moonlight Mint and Daniel Carr was letting us strike coins. I happened to have a 1903-O Morgan Dollar in my possession and "What-the'heck" idea struck me. We were striking his traditional open house souvenirs and we could overstrike another coin if we wanted. Here's the resulting piece.  

7 years ago

These are not counterfeit nickels, just so-called "Magic Trick" coins.

7 years ago
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