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s12k3's Blog

10 Oct 2020

YN Auction Wins!

Coins | s12k3

Hey guys! I recently got my auction wins in the mail, and I am super excited to share how it turned out. The Young Numismatists auction was very good. Thank you to Sam and all of the donors to give us this chance. The Young Numismatists program is amazing. That said, let's jump into the coin.

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08 Oct 2020

The History of The 20 Cent Coin

| s12k3

Hello! I have recently joined the Young Numismatist discord, and it’s been a blast. We had our first meeting last week, which was awesome. Today, I am going to write about the 20c coin. Unfortunately, I do not have one. But it is still an awesome coin. The American twenty-cent piece is a coin struck from 1 8 7 5 to 1 8 7 8, but only for collectors in the final two years. Proposed by Nevada Senator John P. Jones, it proved a failure due to confusion with the quarter, to which it was close in both size and value.

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26 Sep 2020

The History of the 3 Cent Piece

Coins | s12k3

Hey Guys! This will be a blog on the three cent coin, also known as the trime. The three-cent coin was proposed in 1 8 5 1 both as a result of the decrease in postage rates from five cents to three and to answer the need for a small-denomination, easy-to-handle coin. The three-cent silver featured a shield on a six-sided star on the obverse and the Roman numeral III on the reverse. The coin was initially composed of 75% silver and 25% copper to ensure that the coin would be considered real currency yet not worth melting down for the silver. The same coin was later made in nickel because people were hoarding these coins because of the silver. The coins were physically the lightest-weight coins ever minted by the United States, weighing only 4/5 of a gram and with a diameter smaller than a modern dime and only slightly greater than the smallest gold dollars. The silver coins were known as fishscales. The term trimes is often used today for these coins, and was first used by the director of the United States Mint ( James Ross Snowden ) at the time of their production.

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26 Sep 2020

The History of The Peace Silver Dollar Part 2

Coins-United States | s12k3

Hello guys! The topic for today’s blog is the history of the Peace Dollar. It is one of my favorite United States minted coins. If not for the Pittman Act, these coins might not have been produced! The grind for the YN Dollars continues! The Peace dollar is often overshadowed by the Morgan dollar. The roughly 1 8 7 million Peace dollars struck between 1 9 2 1 and 1 9 3 5 was a fraction of the half billion Morgan dollars struck in their time, between 1 8 7 8 and 1 9 0 4 and again in 1 9 2 1. The Peace Dollar is one of the shortest series of silver coins the U.S. Mint has ever issued with only 24 coinsCollectors are often content to have a single example of the high relief 1 9 2 1 Peace dollar and the modified, lower relief 1 9 2 2 to 1 9 3 5 issues for type purposes in their collections. There is a big difference in a regular peace dollar and a high relief peace dollar, which is a little hard to tell by the photos. Did you know the designer Anthony de Francisci based Liberty’s head off of the features of his new bride? That is a pretty cool fact. It was the first American coin that would not have been issued without a concerted push by several prominent numismatists and the American Numismatic Association. In November 1918 Frank Dufield, a numismatist, published an article in The Numismatist, the ANA’s monthly magazine, in which he suggested a circulating coin be issued to celebrate the U.S. victory in the war. Two years later prominent expert Farran Zerbe gave a speech at an ANA convention in Chicago arguing for a coin sold at face value to honor the treaties that ended the war, which he felt was especially fitting since American silver played an important role in the war.The rarest of all Peace Dollars is the 1 9 6 4 - D, as the Denver Mint struck around 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 Peace Dollars in 1 9 6 5 with the 1 9 6 4 date on the coins. Most of these were melted. In fact, it is illegal to possess a 1 9 6 4 - dated Peace dollar because they were not released to the public.Thank you for reading this blog. I hope you enjoyed it. The next blog is about the trime, a three cent coin. See you next time!

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20 Sep 2020

The History of The Peace Silver Dollar

Coins | s12k3

Hello everybody! This blog is going to be about Peace Dollars. This one's for you @Longstrider. Let’s start from the history. The Peace dollar is a United States dollar coin minted from 1921 to 1928, and again in 1934 and 1935. Designed by Anthony de Francisci, the coin was the result of a competition to find designs emblematic of peace. Its obverse represents the head and neck of the Goddess of Liberty in profile, and the reverse depicts a bald eagle at rest clutching an olive branch, with the legend "Peace". It was the last United States dollar coin to be struck for circulation in silver. With the passage of the Pittman Act in 1918, the United States Mint was required to strike millions of silver dollars, and began to do so in 1921, using the Morgan dollar design. Numismatists began to lobby the Mint to issue a coin that memorialized the peace following World War I; although they failed to get Congress to pass a bill requiring the redesign, they were able to persuade government officials to take action. The Peace dollar was approved by Treasury Secretary Andrew Mellon in December 1921, completing the redesign of United States coinage that had begun in 1907. I wish silver coins were still minted for circulation today, but it is not possible with the skyrocketing price of silver. During World War I, the German government hoped to destabilize British rule over India by spreading rumors that the British were unable to redeem for silver all of the paper currency they had printed. These rumors, and hoarding of silver, caused the price of silver to rise and risked damaging the British war effort. The British turned to their war ally, the United States, asking to purchase silver to increase the supply and lower the price. In response, Congress passed the Pittman Act of April 23, 1918. This statute gave the United States authority to sell metal to the British government from up to 350,000,000 silver dollars at $1 per ounce of silver plus the value of the copper in the coins, and handling and transportation fees. Only 270,232,722 coins were melted for sale to the British, but this represented 47% of all Morgan dollars struck to that point. The Treasury was required by the terms of the Act to strike new silver dollars to replace the coins that were melted, and to strike them from silver purchased from American mining companies. I hope you liked today’s blog, see you next time!

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20 Sep 2020

Pandas and Kookaburras

Coins | s12k3

Hey Guys! Today I am going to write about Chinese Silver Pandas and Perth Mint Kookaburras that I own. My school started a week ago so I might not be able to write as much as I did before. That said, let’s jump right into the blog!One of my rarest bullion coins is my colorized silver bullion coins is my colorized silver panda set. According to JM Bullion, “The Chinese Silver Panda coin is one of the most popular annual releases in the silver bullion market. Produced by the Chinese Mint, the primary attraction of these silver coins is the new design that features on the obverse of the coins each year. However, each year there are low-mintage releases of bullion coins that have been altered by authorized third-party groups with beautiful colorization.” There are only 500 of these coins minted, and I have number 313. The coin comes with a COA as well. It features a colorized obverse and one coin shows sunlight, and one coin shows the moon. It has a very big premium over spot, but I think it is worth it. One thing they could improve is colorize the reverse. That would make a big difference, but it would cost more. Overall, it is an amazing coin.I also bought multiple Chinese Silver Pandas. If you buy more than 10 of them, they come in a sheet that holds up to 15. It is a great way of storing them. Since the silver coin debuted in 1983 in proof and 1989 in bullion, there has been a fresh image of the Giant Panda on the obverse every year except for one. The 2002 coin recycled the design from 2001, but due to the lack of popularity for that move, it was never repeated by the Chinese Mint. It used to weigh 1 troy ounce, but now they changed it to 30 grams. I think this was a poor move because most bullion coins weigh 1 troy ounce. Nevertheless, they are very popular in the collector and investor community. I personally love them. My second favorite design is the Kookaburra from the Perth Mint.The Kookaburra coin series is the greatest coin series in Perth Mint history. It has a ridiculous mintage number though. The max mintage is FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND coins. As always, the pictures of all these coins are down below. Thank you for reading!

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10 Sep 2020

The History of The Morgan Silver Dollar Part 2

Coins | s12k3

Hey Guys! It seemed like you enjoyed the last part of the Morgan Silver Dollars, so I decided I will do another. In the early 1960s, a large quantity of uncirculated Morgan dollars in their original bags were discovered in the Treasury vaults, including issues once thought rare. Individuals began purchasing large quantities of the pieces at face value and then removed them from circulation through hoarding, and eventually the Treasury stopped exchanging silver certificates for silver coins.I wish I could get Silver Dollars for face value! Beginning in the 1970s, the Treasury conducted a sale of silver dollars minted at the Carson City Mint through the General Services Administration (GSA (Picture attached below)). All of the Carson City mint coins are key dates and worth more than regular coins even in bad condition.

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06 Sep 2020

The History of The Morgan Silver Dollar

Coins | s12k3

Hey guys! Today I am going to write about the history of Morgan Silver Dollars. The Morgan silver dollar was first minted from 1878-1904, and again in 1921.The coin is named after its designer, United States Mint Assistant Engraver George T. Morgan. The obverse depicts a profile portrait representing Liberty, while the reverse shows an eagle with wings outstretched. The mint mark appears on the reverse above the "o" in "Dollar". If there is no mint mark, it is a “P” mint mark. I personally love Morgan Silver Dollars. They have an amazing sound when they clang together. (I know, I probably shouldn’t do that) They contain 90 % silver and 10 % copper thus having beautiful toning. The dollar was authorized by the Bland–Allison Act. Following the passage of the 1873 act, mining interests lobbied to restore free silver, which would require the Mint to accept all silver presented to it and return it, struck into coin. Instead, the Bland–Allison Act was passed, which required the Treasury to purchase between two and four million dollars' worth of silver at market value to be coined into dollars each month. In 1890, the Bland–Allison Act was repealed by the Sherman Silver Purchase Act, which required the Treasury to purchase 4,500,000 troy ounces (140,000 kg) of silver each month, but only required further silver dollar production for one year. This act, once again, was repealed in 1893.n 1898, Congress approved a bill that required all remaining bullion purchased under the Sherman Silver Purchase Act to be coined into silver dollars. When those silver reserves were depleted in 1904, the Mint ceased to strike the Morgan dollar. The Pittman Act, passed in 1918, authorized the melting and recoining of millions of silver dollars. Pursuant to the act, Morgan dollars resumed mintage for one year in 1921. In the same year, the produced a new coin. The Peace dollar. This is the topic for another blog though. I have added a couple of photos for you to see. Some are of my own coins, while others I found on the internet. Thank you for reading the blog, this was just part one, I may write a few more parts in my blog if you guys like it. I have one 1889 Morgan Silver Dollar, Three 1896 Silver Dollars, and 4 1921 Morgan Silver Dollars. One of the pictures I put below is of a beautifully toned silver Dollar.

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04 Sep 2020

eBay Buying Experiences

| s12k3

Hey Guys! I started buying and selling coins on eBay around 2-3 months ago. There are not may eBay reviews in the blog, so I thought I might do one. My experience is mixed. I have had very good purchases, but a lot of bad ones too. Today, I am going to share it with you. You have to be very cautious when you buy or sell on eBay. It is very easy to get cheated. That said, I have also found wonderful gems for very cheap (that are authentic), but I also have gotten scammed once. Lets start from the positives in buying. I found a MS 63 NGC graded peace dollar for melt value ($ 17 + $ 3 shipping). This was a great buy. You can never go wrong buying high grade silver dollars for melt. It was a great addition to my collection, but I sold it after a month. The Red Book I bought was pretty helpful in determining the price for selling. If you haven't checked out the review of the red book, check it out if you want, it is pretty helpful if you are thinking to buy it. Another wonderful coin lot I bought was a collection of MS 70 Eagles for melt. This was also a wonderful purchase. One strategy I use is apply the newly listed and accepts offers filters. Just give your best offer and 1 out of 10 times they accept it. You also have to record when the opening of the package so you have proof if something goes wrong. Now we can go on to the scams. I bought a one ounce maple leaf coin from a seller that had 100 plus positive feedback and zero negatives. This coin was shipping from Canada. After 7 or 8 days I got it in the mail. I was so happy I recorded opening the package because the seller was arguing that I switched it out with a fake coin (which I wouldn't even thing of doing), but I had a continuous recording of me opening it and measuring the coin. It was a very lousy fake. The diameter of a real Maple leaf is about 1.29 inches, while this coin had a diameter of 1.6-1.7 (picture attached). It was also almost 2 ozs in weight. After I showed him the recording, he admitted, and said he only sold it to get something back because he was also scammed. After that, I was quickly refunded the whole thing including tax and shipping. Without the recording, it would have probably taken much longer. There are a lot of crooks on eBay so be careful. This is just my opinion so please take it with a grain of salt. I hope you learned something, and see you next time!

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02 Sep 2020

My Thoughts on the 2021 Red Book and Blue Book.

| s12k3

Hello guys! I recently won a raffle for a $50 Amazon gift card. This was pretty easy since I was the only one who entered (L O L). The first thought that came to my mind was: "Why not buy an Amazon fifty dollar coin grab bag? I can be like Silverpicker!"(By the way he is a great guy and awesome coin Youtuber.) I looked for about 20-30 minutes I was finding nothing but scams. Then finally, I remembered that I did not have the 2021 Red Book or the Blue Book. I mean, why not buy them both? I got them in about 5 days later, I am pretty happy with them. The Red Book has the number of coins minted, the conditions, multiple colored pictures, and all the variants. It has a lot of prices that collectors will pay for various conditions, as well as more general information. The only thing that I am unhappy about is the price for silver coins. As you can see in the picture captioned "Silver Half Dollars" down below, you will see that the price for a G half dollar is eight dollars. The current price as of today is about ten dollars. Since I collect mostly junk silver, this is not very helpful. But then again, they cannot account for fluctuations in the silver spot price. It is more useful for numismatic coins. If you are having the same problem, I would suggest using websites like coinflation and coinapps. Links:http://www.coinflation.com/coins/silver_coin_calculator.htmlandhttp://coinapps.com/silver/coin/calculator/These websites will tell you the melt value for your junk silver coins. I find that coinapps is better because you can put an assortment of silver coins and it will tell you the melt value of all of them combined. The Blue Book is more useful if you are a coin dealer looking to buy coins. It gives you a general idea of what dealers will pay for a coin. Again, it changes if there are fluctuations in the price. The other bad part is that the photos are not in color. (See the picture captioned "Blue Book" down below) This sucks because you can't see the true beauty of the coin. Overall, these books are pretty useful for collectors and everyone should buy them. I mostly provided the negatives because they were important, but there are many more positives. Take this with a grain of salt because it is only my opinion. Thank you for taking out the time to read this! See you next time!

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