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Conordon's Blog

09 Feb 2020

United States Mints

| Conordon

Do you know how coins are made? First a strip of metal is used to make the blanks. The leftover metal is used to make another strip of metal. The blanks are heated so they are soft and easy to make designs in it. After that They are cleaned. Then the rims are made on the blanks and then they go into the die. The die punches the design into the coin. Finally the coins are checked and any errors are removed. Some errors make it through and go into circulation. Some error coins are worth a lot of money. Proof coins are made in a different way. Proof coins polished and struck multiple times to make them look perfect. Then they are checked and put into airtight packagesand aresold to collectors. Coins are made in many different places called mints. Each mint puts a small letter called a mint mark. Mint marks show where the coins are made. There are currently 4 mints. are in Philadelphia, Denver, West Point, and San Francisco. Their mint marks are P, D, W, and S. There are also 4 former mints. They were in Carson City, New Orleans, Charlotte, and Dahlonega. Their mint marks are CC, O, C, and D. The oldest mint is Philadelphia. It has made coins since 1793. The newest is West Point it has made coins since 1984. Cents made inPhiladelphia and in West Point haveno mint mark. Also before 1979Philadelphia had no mint marks excepton wartime silver nickels. Some proof coins without mint marksare worth thousands ofdollars. Thank you for reading this. I hope you enjoyed reading about mints, how coins are made, and mint marks.

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