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14 Oct 2019

Issue 2:- South African Coin Competition-Part 3:- Numismatic News by Rishi Gokhale (a Young Numismatist)

Coins | user_53367

THIS IS AN ORIGINAL ARTICLE!! PLEASE CITE THIS ARTICLE IF ANY INFORMATION FROM IT IS USED FROM IT VIA THE CITATION BELOW!!


Citation:- Gokhale, Rishi. (2019). Issue 2:- South African Coin Competition-Part 3:- Numismatic News by Rishi Gokhale (a Young Numismatist). (Blog) American Numismatic Association Blog. Available at:https://www.money.org/collector/user_53367/blog/issue-2-south-african-coin-competition-part-3-numismatic-news-by-rishi-gokhale-a-young-numismatist- [Accessed 14 Oct. 2019].



Issue 2:- South African Coin Competition-Part 3:- Numismatic News by Rishi Gokhale (a Young Numismatist)


By:- Rishi S. Gokhale


Welcome to the final part of this article. If you have not already read the first two parts, please do so.

The first of the non-circulation (collector's only coin) is the "We The People" 50 Rand coin, released in April 2019, and designed by Peter Mammes. The official SA25 website states this about the coin, "Made from an aluminium bronze alloy, the R50: We the People collectable coin bears two hands and fingers intertwined as a symbol of unity between the people of our nation. Promoting democracy and unity, the phrase "we the people" has become a commonly known global ideal, after which this coin is fashioned. Designer Peter Mammes, wanted to simultaneously depict diversity and togetherness. The intertwined hands that read as unity in South African sign language do not show any race, religion, age or other markers against which one might discriminate. Rather, they show togetherness, a sign of what the nation has been striving to attain in the past 25 years." The coin is made of an aluminum-bronze alloy, weighs 24.45 grams, has a diameter of 38.725mm, and has a rounded shape. The coin's reverse has two holding hands which are pointing up, with the words, "25 Years of Constitutional Democracy" written above. The words "We The People" are engraved on the right side of the coin, below which, "R50" is written. The coin's obverse along with the other non-circulation coins made for the SA25 program has the South African Coat of Arms.

The second coin in the non-circulation series is the "25 Years of Constitutional Democracy" 50 Rand coin, released in April 2019, and designed by Lady Skollie. The SA25 website says the following about the coin, "The year 1994 saw South Africa liberated from a widely condemned system, and welcomed one of liberation, where citizens from all walks of life could cast their vote at the ballot box. The famous images of voting polling stations in 1994 with their snake-like qualities of running into coils of people; Khoisan rock paintings; and the element of waiting for a better tomorrow, all provided inspiration for this coin. Designed by Lady Skollie, the R50 sterling-silver collectable coin represents the great strides made in our nation in 25 years of constitutional democracy. With our constitution today, we are now all equal before the law and no one can be discriminated against on the basis of race, culture, language, gender, sexual orientation, religion, or any other grounds. Our constitution is committed to the continued development and prosperity of the nation, policy making and the ability for all citizens to vote and choose how they would like their government to rule." The coin is made of .925 silver, weighs 33.626 grams, has a diameter of 38.725mm, and is rounded. The coin's reverse features a long zig-zagging line of people, with the words "25 Years of Constitutional Monarchy" written above. To the left, the words "1 oz Ag925 Cu75" are present, while "R50" is written to the right.

The final coin in the non-circulation series, the, "The Constitutional Court of South Africa", 500 Rand coin, was released in May 2019, and designed by Shaun Gaylard. The SA25 website states this about the coin, "The Constitutional Court of South Africa - R500 Gold collectable coin will be immortalised as a part of South Africa's history, marking a significant milestone in our country's progress! Located in Johannesburg, the Constitutional Court itself is a beacon of hope and stands tall as testament to 25 years of constitutional democracy. Functioning as the right arm of justice, its main authority is to rule on whether laws conflict with constitutionally established rules, rights, and freedoms, among other things, in order to ensure that all South Africans are treated fairly and that their human rights are not violated." The coin is made of 999.9 pure gold, has a diameter of 32.69mm, weighs 31.107 grams, and is rounded. The coin's reverse features the Constitutional Court of South Africa in the city of Johannesburg, with the words "R500" on its roof. Above the city and the court, the words "Constitutional Court of South Africa" are engraved, while to the right side of the coin, "1 oz Au 999.9" are written.

Now, I will tell you about the reason these coins were made, and its impact on South Africa. During colonial South Africa, an apartheid system was set up where much like the southern United States where between the end of the Civil War, and the 1960s, black people were being treated with much less respect than white people. Punishments for crimes in South Africa were much worse for blacks, and change would not come quick. However, through persistence, in the early 1990s, apartheid was ended, and a constitution was written in 1994 after Nelson Mandela was elected as the 1st president. This constitution gave all people the same rights, regardless of race, religion, or other things. This now leads us to today where South Africa is now a better place, and while remnants of racism are being pursued by both whites and blacks, things are changing, and South Africa is slowly turning into a major nation in Africa.

From apartheid to equal rights, these coins truly show the beauty of the rights given to every person, and help every person in South Africa think about some of them by simply looking into their pockets.



PLEASE CITE THIS ARTICLE IF ANY INFORMATION FROM IT IS USED FROM IT VIA THE CITATION BELOW!!

Gokhale, Rishi. (2019). Issue 2:- South African Coin Competition-Part 3:- Numismatic News by Rishi Gokhale (a Young Numismatist). (Blog) American Numismatic Association Blog. Available at:https://www.money.org/collector/user_53367/blog/issue-2-south-african-coin-competition-part-3-numismatic-news-by-rishi-gokhale-a-young-numismatist- [Accessed 14 Oct. 2019].






My Sources:-

https://www.numismaticnews.net/article/south-african-mint-announces-public-design-competition-for-next-sa25-circulation-coin


https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces171329.html


https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces171367.html


https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces171368.html


https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces174116.html


https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces174117.html


https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces169474.html


https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces174118.html


https://www.sa25.co.za/index.html


https://www.sa25.co.za/competition.html


https://www.sa25.co.za/circulation.html


https://www.sa25.co.za/collectors.html


https://www.samint.co.za/2019-range/#tab-id-6





Comments

Longstrider

Level 6

Very nice. I especially like your words about the apartheid history and it's abolishing. Nice to get a first hand account. I can see your pride in South Africa. Thanks.

Mike

Level 7

Your sources are all from the net. I was doing some research on dates. I found them the article was written in 2011. There good but be careful there not up to date sometimes.Books are the answer. Great blog.

user_53367

Level 3

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