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Mark Lovmo's Blog

24 Jul 2019

South Korean 1969 Five-Won "Wide Date" and "Narrow Date"

Coins | Mark Lovmo

Here is a photo of two South Korean 1969-dated Five-Won coins.

When showing these two dates to officials at the Korean Mint last month, they doubted that there are two varieties in the photos, and said that it was probably just a trick of the light. I should have showed them my other photo that has a closer view and some graphics I added that help the eye see how the numerals line up to the word, "KOREA," above the dates.

According to the Korean Mint's own internal histories, the first year that they began pressing their own working dies was in 1969. I believe that the Korean Mint applied the dates by hand. Does this still make these two coins "varieties" or something else? And if so, what is that something else?

I just want to make sure that I'm not the only one who sees this.

Comments

I. R. Bama

Level 5

I'll have to look through my Korean coins. Mike B makes an interesting point about what is a variety and what is not.

Kepi

Level 6

Great photos! I definitely see the difference but not sure about "varieties". Really cool find for sure! Thanks for sharing!

Longstrider

Level 6

Wow. As if I don't have enough problems with US error coins. Check out CONECA. Here is what NGC says Mint Error Coins with major mint errors as a result of human or mechanical error during manufacturing. Variety A variety is a coin that differs from its basic design type in some distinctive way and is thus differentiated by collectors. Thanks and good luck..

Mark Lovmo

Level 4

Then what should I call them? One has wider spacing in the date than the other. You can clearly see it in-hand.

World_Coin_Nut

Level 5

I know you are one of the experts on Korean coins. I don't know if these are varieties or not but will trust in your opinion.

It's Mokie

Level 6

If they stamped the dates by hand, they probably used a stamp that incorporated the entire date, rather than single numbers. I think it was just a case of slightly different placement of the stamp when applying the date, that would explain why the lines you added seem to have a different alignment to KOREA.

Mark Lovmo

Level 4

Then what should this effect be named? I mean, what is the correct numismatic terminology?

It's Mokie

Level 6

The use of a four number punch might also explain why it appears the date is smaller, although I don't see it in the pictures, as the adding of the date might vary by the strength of the punch hammerer.

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