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Mr_Norris_LKNS's Blog

30 Mar 2019

1937 Irish Penny Error Coin

Coins | Mr_Norris_LKNS

I found this one in a pile of large pennies. If you look carefully you will see that the harp motif is both forwards and backwards on the obverse. On the reverse, you can see what looks like some backwards imprinting of the date above the chicken's head. What type of error is this?

Comments

I agree with Numinerd9 that this is a post-mint piece. If it were a true brockage, you would have just an incuse harp design on the reverse. Here you have a full normal reverse with an incuse reverse. Also, the obverse looks damaged, rather than worn. For this to have happened at the press, a fully stuck penny would have to have landed on a properly struck penny and the two gone through the press again which would have left a very distinct obverse double strike. Brockages are not all that rare, even in fairly modern pieces, but much more common in ancients. In modern coins, however, the brockage really ruins one or both coins, so they tend to be quite munched.

Numinerd9

Level 5

Post Mint damage (PMD); not an actual error. This is a relatively common faked error done by squeezing two or more coins together. Some have commented correctly - if it were genuine, the secondary images would not be incuse and backward; they'd appear just as a normal coin would but with two distinct strikes. Read more about "Sandwich coins" here: https://conecaonline.org/brockage-or-not-sandwich-coins/ Sorry I didn't have better news for you. -Sam Gelberd, ANA Numismatic Educator.

Mr_Norris_LKNS

Level 4

Excellent reference, and I am not disappointed at all: for the cost of a dime I received a great example of a post-mint altered coin that could be confused with a mint error. It made me think about the minting process and how it could have happened. There are some extremely unlikely ways this could have happened at the mint requiring such contortions of chance that it almost certainly did not. I got the input of others with more experience in error coins and the minting process than I have. And now I have been introduced to CONECA as a resource for error collecting and investigation. All for a dime! I call that cheap tuition for a valuable education. Thank you and others for commenting!

coinsbygary

Level 5

This one is most interesting. If it was a clashed die the reverse would have left it's mark on the obverse die and appear on every coin struck after that. Instead, the obverse planchet looks like it was struck twice with two harps way out of sync with each other. The perplexing thing about this is that you should have similar markings on the reverse if this was true.

Longstrider

Level 6

Looks like a big old die clash to me.

CoinLady

Level 6

Really have to see in person, but it sounds like a clashed die.

Mike

Level 7

If you go to what and search Irish penny's on ebay and the date you will see the prices in excellent shape. There disappointing . Very few Irish coins are worth much. Those used for the fight for independence King James the hammered coin and first King of Ireland and there not big on errors because of what there made of. Look I don't collect my own home coins. I'm not a fan of them. Didn't like them when I was born and lived there. So maybe it worth a couple of bucks it's heavily used and it could be graffiti. But there made so ceeply I didn't bother . Maybe you have a rare find. Some go for 70. 00 some 200.00 it depends on the coin. The luck of the Irish be with you.Pat

"SUN"

Level 6

Interesting discussion on your coin. Blogs like yours makes this site fun and educational.

It's Mokie

Level 6

so maybe a worn coin that resulted from clashed dies originally? Could be.

Kepi

Level 6

This is a very cool coin. I'm not sure about an error... I think Pat would have the best answer on this one. Good luck!

That looks like it could be an excellent find. Even if it is not this is still a good find and a cool coin.

Mike

Level 7

I see Irish writing not a backwards 9 I m not going to convince you so bring it to a dealer. It's worth 4.95 I was born there and have the coin who knows. If it is I can tell you there not big on mistakes as we are. Lots of luck.

Mr_Norris_LKNS

Level 4

i guess I should have said earlier, I bought it with a handful of other large pennies mixed in with British, Australian, etc., from the bargain bin at a dealers shop today. After showing it to him he said “nice find.” Neither of us have any idea what it’s worth. But what’s got me more curious is how it happened. Usually a clashed die results in parts of the obverse appearing reversed in the background of the reverse side of a coin, and vice versa. This coin, however, has a reversed image of the obverse in the background of the obverse. I cannot picture how this would happen.

Mike

Level 7

The Harp is the Symbol of Ireland has been for centuries. I do not see an error. Above the chickens head is Irish for one penny what you see on the obverse is the the side of the Harp. I have the coin in my hands it gives the appearance of two sets of strings when it's actually the wood that the player holds.I was given the set of coins when I was the Aide to the Grand Marshall Moureen OHara in the N.Y. St.Patrick's Day parade . There all encased in a two way frame so you can see the obverse and reverse. Pat.

Mr_Norris_LKNS

Level 4

Look at the enlarged photo of the harp obverse. You see where it says “Eireann” on the right... look in that area and you’ll see a backwards 9. You can faintly see a backwards 1 behind the “nn” next to it. Now go across from that to the left towards about 10 o’clock... you’ll see a backwards 37. The backwards image of the harp is visible behind the correct harp in the foreground.

PastorK7354

Level 4

Very interesting. Not versed enough yet to answer the question about the error.

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