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coinfodder's Blog

10 Sep 2022

The Fifty States of Coins: Part 29: New Hampshire

Coins | coinfodder

God, I haven't uploaded in what seems like a lifetime. Well, here we go, I'll try to upload about once or twice a month around my busy schedule... Well good news, im watching the ANA auction with Emily and Andy the fighting numismatist...so I have time...


MAY 28: Nevada


here we go folks...


Welcome back to CoinFodder's Road Trip around the states, last time we met, we where in the Silver state of Nevada. Now, we finally move on toward New Hampshire...if we can find anyone there in the tiny state...


Various tribes, mostly from the Algonquian language group, settled the area before English and French settlers took over the area in the early 1600s. The first permanent settlement was at Hilton's Point, near present-day Dover. In 1679, New Hampshire became a Royal Province.


During the Revolutionary War, a raid was conducted on Fort William and Mary, in 1774, was the only battle in the state during the war. After the US reacted independence, NH ratified the Constitution, and became the 9th state to join the union.


Starting in 1952, the state became the first primary in the federal election cycle, gaining the state much notoriety.


Today, this state remains a quiet state, modest about their reputation as political testing group. Famous residents include Franklin Pierce, Carlton Fisk, JD Salinger, and Augustus Saint-Gaudens.


NOW, FOR THE COINS...


The 50state Quarter, minted in 2000, is a relief of the current (albeit in a million shards of rock and dirt) symbol of the state, The Old Man of the Mountain. It once graced the face of Cannon Mountain. As it was a very old rock feature, and due to much climbing and vandalism, the man collapsed in 2003.


The America the Beautiful quarter honors White Mountain, the tallest mountain in New Hampshire, and home of the fastest and highest winds in the United States ever recorded.


But we cannot just end there. We must talk about New Hampshire's own coin artist, Augustus Saint-Gaudens.


Born from Dublin, the sculptor was known as a fine artist, making sculptures during the Beaux-Arts generation. These include the MASSIVE Robert Gourd Shaw Memorial on Boston Common, William Tecumseh Sherman, and General John Logan. But we only care about coins here, and two coins really "strike" his legacy as one of America's finest sculptors.


During the olden days, about 100 years ago, Theodore Roosevelt, tired of the Barber coinage, desired a complete overhaul and redesign of American coinage, and hired Saint-Gaudens to do the same. The cancer-ridden and old sculptor agreed, working on the coins from his home in Cornish, NH, created two designs, one being a very high relief "Liberty" design for the double eagle, and another high relief design for the Eagle gold. Both, after his death in 1907, would require a redesign in 1908, as the high relief had them hard to stack, so the relief would be lowered for banks and commerce.


Thanks y'all. I'm having fun at the auction. Hope you are too.



Please ask Numimaster (Preston) for link. I have been providing the editing Link.



Link to TheNumisMaster's website and Centsearchers Newsletter. On his behalf, I am asking for subscribers. It is completely free. -www.numismastery.weebly.com



Guess the Song Lyrics: Last Time:Simon and Garfunkel's The Sound of Silence


Well a simple kinda life never did me no harm

A raisin' me a family and workin' on the farm

My days are all filled with an easy country charm


...


Well I got me a fine wife I got me an ol' fiddle

When the sun's comin' up I got cakes on the griddle

And life ain't nothin' but a funny funny riddle


...

Comments

AC coin$

Level 6

Great coin and nice blog .

Longstrider

Level 6

OK. Here is how it works for me at least. We donate cons and numi supplies throughout the year. WE, my wife and I, don't keep trak of what happens to them. That job belongs to Sam. He applies them to the monthly auctions, the yearly auction, coin shows, and anywhere he sees fit. It's just fun to watch you YN's bid.

slybluenote

Level 5

I resemble ALL of the above remarks! Great post, and it was a very enjoyable read! Also good pictures of your coins. I’ve also visited the “Granite State” along with Vermont. A friend that I was stationed with in Ft. Devens, Mass. had a sister that lived there that we visited occasionally. Thanks for sharing your research! I subscribed quite a while ago to Numismaster’s newsletter but haven’t visited the website in a while.

Rebelfire76

Level 4

John Denver: Thank God I’m a country boy. Good bit of history to go along with New Hampshire. Well represented by its 50 state quarter and ATB quarter.

Long Beard

Level 5

New Hampshire and Vermont, two spectacular states. Saw both in 2012, Laconia Bike Week.

TCHTrove

Level 4

Great blog, great information. Thanks for sharing!

Longstrider

Level 6

Where is the auction link??????//

user_30405

Level 4

what coin did you donate? I recorded how heavy most of the bids were on mosst of the lots, I'd tell you if I know which lot.

coinfodder

Level 5

You donated? Thank you for your contribution.

Longstrider

Level 6

Thanks. I guess they just want YN's not the people that donate.

user_30405

Level 4

it was sent out to YN's who signed up, they are holding it through google meet this time, ask kelley@money.org.

Mike

Level 7

August Saint Gaudens was born in Ireland and came here at six months to New Your! William and Mary is the oldest college in the United states.Another great read . I do enjoy your blogs. You have so much research you can not enjoy it. I do. Thanks for your time and educating us!! John Denver song. Country boy!!

Kepi

Level 6

I got this one! John Denver..."Thank God I'm a Country Boy". ; )

Kepi

Level 6

Gotcha! haha I really enjoyed your blog! Great photos too. I like that "Old Man of the Mountain" coin. Have fun with the auction today! ; )

coinfodder

Level 5

spoilers darn

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