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Proof set crackout

Hello everyone once again. I recently picked up a 2009 lincoln cent proof set, that doesn't have the original mint box or COA. I want to crack it out to put the coins in my small cent collection. And I noticed, that the plastic mint packaging seemed to be the same type as those 3x5 plastic Snaplock coin holders that you can buy. Does this mean that if I did crack it out, I could put it back together with the same cardboard coin holder and one of the 3x5 plastic holders?

1 year ago

Ya, I noticed the same thing! I found out that if you use your finger nail around the edge, you can open a modern proof set without cracking it or anything.

1 year ago

Oh, and I think so.

1 year ago

Ok I was thinking of something else. I take a razor very dangerous slip it between the top and bottom and slowly lift the the top up. We're gloves not cotton ones. Once you get it separate lift the top off. It takes some moving but that's the way I keep. It. You don't need a C.O.A. People know.what they are

1 year ago

I don't really understand what the COA is for anyways. Like, if it is to authenticate it, someone can easily just print a COA or take a real one from a different proof set and match it with one that isn't real

1 year ago

If you can fake a coin you can certainly fake a COA. Most people wouldn't know a fake COA. Maybe we need a guide book for fake coins and fake COA's. I have never broke open a set. I may buy some inexpensive ones and practice !

1 year ago

Yes, you can open a Mint Holder for proofs without breaking it.  Back when I was a naive little numismatist boy, I used to do that quite often.... ...to clean my proofs >_

1 year ago

Update: I did the crackout. It went smoothly, the coins came out just fine. The packaging wasn't damaged, and I was able to open and close it so if I ever decide to put them back in I can

1 year ago

Good to hear! 

1 year ago

Good info.

1 year ago
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